Wylie Writes



Permission is dressed-up old news.  The film looks good and the cast is hip, but the lengths the film will go to explore provocative themes within a relationship are much more common than the film believes.


Great Great Great

Great Great Great kicks off with a disconnected exchange following huge news.  Corporate worker Lauren (Sarah Kolasky) is told about her parents’ divorce by her mother.  Mom is aloof – almost to a numbing degree – but Lauren is shook up.  Her long-term relationship with Tom (Suck It Up’s Dan Beirne) is satisfyingly comfortable, but she suddenly fears of a future of boredom.  A flash-from-the-past in the form of a new co-worker/old friend (Richard Clarkin) triggers Lauren to…

Addio Commentary

Addio Commentary: An Award Season Rollercoaster

I don’t know what type of Oscar nominations I prefer: a list of predictable winners, or names and films that are constantly in a status shift.  Judging by all of the different winners in recent award ceremonies, it’s clear the 90th annual Oscars fall in the latter category.  But, again, I’m stumped over if I actually enjoy this much variety.


A Futile and Stupid Gesture

It makes sense for David Wain to direct a biopic about Doug Kenney.  The absurdist director of Wet Hot American Summer, Role Models, and Wanderlust works with a special brand of off-beat comedy as Kenney’s National Lampoon brainchild did.  Even though the biopic genre is new ground for Wain, A Futile and Stupid Gesture is still a comedy cut from familiar cloth.


Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Joyce Wong

By: Jessica Goddard Wexford Plaza was one of the best films of 2017, and it was also a finalist for the Toronto Film Critic Association’s award for Best Canadian Film.  As the film celebrates its home release on digital platforms, I reached out to writer/director Joyce Wong to ask about her feature debut, its universal story, and her personal connection to the film.