Wylie Writes

Reviews

Muse: Drones World Tour

By: Graeme Howard When a live concert film is done right, it can create a viewing experience that is wholly unique to the live counterpart. Muse: Drones World Tour is an exciting live concert experience on the big screen, providing a non-stop hour-and-a-half of music and sensory overload.  That being said, there are a few minor criticisms that hold this live concert experience from a wider appeal to the masses as opposed to being just fan…

Reviews

The Oslo Diaries

By: Jessica Goddard A well-paced timeline of the 1990s peace negotiations in the Middle East, The Oslo Diaries skillfully articulates the sense of both hope and skepticism in the period.  Directed by Mor Loushy and Daniel Sivan, the filmmakers use diary excerpts, historical footage, news clips, and participant commentary to paint a picture of simultaneous optimism and doubt surrounding the Oslo Accords.

Reviews

Boundaries

By: Nick van Dinther In Boundaries, director Shana Feste tells a story that’s loosely based on her relationship with her father and their shared life experience;  which makes it surprising that one of the movie’s biggest setbacks is how cliché it is, and how it lacks realism.

Reviews

Sunset

Sunset is the disaster movie audiences had no idea they needed.  Instead of overreaching for thrilling spectacles, director Jamison M. LoCascio presents a subdued, dialogue-driven film featuring a relatable cast of characters reacting and adapting to a critical state of emergency.

Reviews

Uncle Drew

By: Graeme Howard Considering the fact that Uncle Drew originated as a Pepsi advertisement campaign, it is surprising that the film is not a complete and utter train wreck.  Instead viewers are treated to a passable film that will appeal to NBA fans.  However the abundance of product placements and issues with pacing lead to a largely by-the-book film that misses more than it dunks.

Reviews

In Darkness

By: Leah Kuperman In Darkness stars a blind protagonist who gets caught in the violent crimes of the London underground.  Writer/director Anthony Byrne (BBC’s Peaky Blinders) offers viewers a gripping film with ample twists and turns but most interesting, however, was the way his movie portrayed the life and disability of its protagonist.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Sook-Yin Lee

Sook-Yin Lee is currently mystifying Toronto movie goers with her long-awaited return to feature-length filmmaking.  Octavio is Dead! gradually reels us in with a dream-like allure as we observe Tyler (Sarah Gadon) rediscover herself through the death of her absent father (Raoul Max Trujillo).  From there, Lee strings her audience on a winding narrative that consistently maintains a personal intimacy throughout its run.