Reviews

Skate Kitchen

Crystal Moselle, who made a name for herself as a documentarian with the 2015 hit The Wolfpack, takes inspiration from Larry Clark’s career in her narrative feature debut Skate Kitchen.  It’s a seamless transition for Moselle who is experimenting (and subtlety infiltrating) with documentary aesthetics to tell a scripted story about a young woman who is trying to gain acceptance while searching for independence.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ Two-On-One with Robert Deaton and John C. McGinley

Benched is pitched (har, har) to audiences as the latest entry in the sports movie genre, but it almost ends up working more as a buddy comedy instead.  The scenes of gameplay are present and they’re easy to get wrapped up in, but the drive behind those scenes – along with other elements in this charming story of winning and losing – is the love/hate dynamic between two little league coaches playing on the same…

Reviews

Benched

Benched is a no-brainer recommendation for sports movie fans.  It’s charming, funny and, despite its rote concepts, the filmmakers put forth enough effort to give audiences something different.

Reviews

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

Netflix’s To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is too slight and trivial even by teen movie standards, but I’m hoping it will make its young viewers talk to each other more.  So many misunderstandings and rumours in Sofia Alvarez’s stalled screenplay would’ve been squashed if people had stopped their worrying and had simple conversations with other characters.

Reviews

King Cohen

There is a police parade walking down the street.  Dozens of men in uniform are walking in formation, surrounded by revelers.  Suddenly, Andy Kaufman pulls out a gun and shoots someone down.  He is subdued and shot.  With his last breath, he says “God told me to.”  I have only seen one Larry Cohen film, and yet it managed to contain one scene which placed itself directly into my brain.  Cohen has spent decades writing…

Reviews

The Miseducation of Cameron Post

As people grow up, ideas are suggested to them from various sources to help craft their life in a certain way.  However with The Miseducation of Cameron Post, co-writer/director Desiree Akhavan makes an argument about the search for personal individuality which is not only liberating, but absolutely valid.  Adapting Emily M. Danforth’s novel of the same name, Akhavan shows audiences that no matter what customs or beliefs are enforced onto another person, their voice and personality…

Reviews

Puzzle

By: Trevor Chartrand By no means a masterpiece, Puzzle is a dramatic character study with some great performances – a quiet, nuanced beauty.  Moving at a slow yet even pace, this film assembles the puzzle of these characters’ lives, only to tear it apart – piece by piece.

Reviews

3: An Eye for an Eye

By: Graeme Howard Lou Simon’s 3: An Eye for an Eye is a revenge thriller with a healthy amount of twists to subvert viewer expectations.  Unfortunately, the stiff and unconvincing performances lead to an experience that will be predictable, drab, and confusing for most.