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Bigger

Bigger is an abysmal biopic about the Weider brothers, Joe and Ben, which is unfortunate because the world of fitness is due for an engrossing movie.  Not a flabby flick like this.

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Strange Nature

Some will compare Strange Nature to Eli Roth’s Cabin Fever based on a glance at the film’s premise about a deadly outbreak.  Others, including myself, will find the flick to be a fitting throwback to a brand of vintage cinema that gave audiences thrills and chills yet remained ambiguous about its genre.  Is it a horror?  A thriller?  And, does the plot act as a parable for a real-life disaster?  In the same way Godzilla…

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Let the Corpses Tan

While Let the Corpses Tan tells a thin tale about thieves on the run, it’s nothing short of complex in terms of visual storytelling.  Using – quite possibly – the best edits I’ve seen in a movie this year, Belgian directors/screenwriters Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani (The ABC’s of Death) offer audiences pure entertainment that works as both a western and a crime-thriller.

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The Old Man & the Gun

By: Trevor Chartrand Part romance, part crime-drama, The Old Man & the Gun is the gripping, yet low-key, story of notorious bank robber Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford).  Based on the true story of a life-long criminal and prison escape artist, the film examines Tucker as a unique breed of villain.  Always calm and in control – but not in the suave, Ocean’s 11 type of way.  When Tucker robs a bank, he’s simply courteous, polite,…

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Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Jutta Brendemühl

The primary of objective of Goethe Films is to bring German cinema and television to Canadian audiences.  Though the series is known for showcasing contemporary art house film, the selection this October is of a slightly different flavour.  On October 4th, Goethe Films will host the exclusive Canadian premiere of Bad Banks, a co-produced German-Luxembourgish mini-series.  I had to opportunity to chat with Jutta Brendemühl, curator of the Goethe Films series, about Bad Banks, and…

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The First Purge

The Purge wasn’t a typical horror film.  It was an intense bottle film that found ways to give movie goers the heebie-jeebies by poking holes in assumably safe conditions.  It also showcased nimble newcomer James DeMonaco, a skillful director who could use paranoia and predictability to deliver an engrossing movie.  DeMonaco directed the next two Purge movies – films I never saw but I’ve been eager to catch up with.  Hopefully, those films are better…

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Bad Banks

Numbers aren’t my thing;  I never enjoyed math in school and thinking about RRSP’s makes me want to take a nap.  Yet only two episodes into creator Oliver Kienle’s financial thriller, Bad Banks, I found myself completely immersed in the twists and turns of the high-stakes world of investment banking.

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My Generation

By: Jessica Goddard Half documentary, half pet project from Michael Caine, My Generation is vaguely informative but mostly a colourful nostalgia trip to 1960s creative hotspot London.  The film arcs from explaining the roots of the culturally significant music, fashion, and photography of young London in the 60s to imparting what happened when those same tastemakers dove headfirst into vice (Caine told The Guardian in a recent interview, “What ruined the 60s, towards the end…

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Minding the Gap

By: Trevor Chartrand First-time director Bing Liu shows some real promise with his highly personal and reflective documentary, Minding the Gap.  Viewers watching may find themselves concerned early on, especially since the film appears to focus on a group of skater burn-outs and their quest to get drunk.  However, the doc challenges those expectations and quickly proves to be a profound examination of their troubled lives.

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Lizzie

Lizzie is a decent psychological slow burn, but its problematic pacing leaves me wondering if the film could’ve been stronger had it been workshopped more.  With his second feature film, director Craig William Macneill demonstrates his ability to build tension through taut silences and piercing instrumentals.  However, Bryce Kass’ script doesn’t match the filmmaker’s patience.