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Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

The Final Year

The Final Year captures the calm before the storm.  With an upcoming (and controversial) election on the horizon, director Greg Barker gained exclusive access to the Obama administration by chronicling activity by the former president and his foreign policy team.

Reviews

The Road Movie

Starting this month, Dmitrii Kalashnikov’s experimental doc The Road Movie begins a theatrical tour that will last over a year.  Toronto’s Royal Cinema is the first stop, and the journey continues through the United States before heading back to Canada next February;  it concludes in Boulder, Colorado the following month.  That’s impressive for a shoestring indie, especially one that would be “TOO HOT FOR TV”.  Twenty years ago, Joe Francis would’ve sold this at 2:00am…

Reviews

The Polka King

Fans of Nacho Libre may be the ones enjoying The Polka King more than other Netflix viewers.  After all, it’s a crooked “Robin Hood” story starring Jack Black as an eccentric entertainer.  The Polka King, however, is a biopic.

Reviews

Bright

Suicide Squad director David Ayer reunites with Will Smith to bring at-home audiences Bright, a Netflix Original action movie that blends “cop drama” and “buddy comedy” but exists in a fantasy amongst the mystical company of fairies and orcs.

Reviews

Ramen Heads

A documentary about ramen sounds a little thin (and, believe me, the movie is), but the interviewees in Ramen Heads pull their weight and offer audiences interesting tidbits about the art, history, and “slurpibility” of the delicacy.

Reviews

Friend Request

Horror fodder like Friend Request tends to be dismissed based on its timely nature, which is really too bad.  These digital age thrillers may borrow from other formulas (or other movies), but they certainly are not derivative.  In the case of Friend Request, it owes a debt of gratitude to fellow social media flick Unfriended, but it fuses its modern premise of cyberstalking with revered lore and finds a good balance between “old” and “new”…

Reviews

Dim the Fluorescents

Dim the Fluorescents is a fast and furious masterclass in deadpan comedy.  Its filmmaker, Daniel Warth, knows this and doesn’t miss an opportunity to make an uncomfortably honest comment about creative communities, or portray convoluted art – no matter how ridiculous it is – as believable impassioned labours of love.