Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Love, Gilda

Love, Gilda captures the spirit and energy of comedienne Gilda Radner. That achievement alone makes Lisa Dapolito’s documentary a success. What makes the film particularly exceptional though is how it duals as a recap of Radner’s life, and as a master class in comedy.

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival ’18

The Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a variety of well-realized works, made by young filmmakers worth keeping watch for.  The festival’s whopping total of 47 films are split into four programmes – the kids presentation Sparks (screening on September 21), followed by Forging Our Own Discourse, Moving Forward, and Searching For Belonging (screening, in order, on September 22).

Reviews

Mandy

Using brilliantly ominous visuals and an amazingly unsettling musical score, Panos Cosmatos’ Mandy serves up a simple story that isn’t on the same level of competence as those technical achievements.  Cage and Andrea Riseborough (The Death of Stalin) play Red and Mandy, a soft-spoken bohemian couple who are suddenly captured and tortured by a travelling crew of cultists.  When his girlfriend is kidnapped and used as a pawn for a “special” ritual, Red has no other desire…

Reviews

Sierra Burgess Is a Loser

The Netflix Gods heard my distain for the streaming service’s teen flick hit To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, and they’ve gifted me a charming high school comedy titled Sierra Burgess Is a Loser as an apologetic gesture.  Call it coincidental timing, I call it wishful thinking.

Reviews

Cardinals

Chilly character drama Cardinals revolves around a trauma that ends in death and a prison sentencing.  And while it appears justice has been served, interest flares up when suspicions drudge up the past.

Reviews

American Animals

Playing like a more intellectual and more comprehensible Pain & Gain, Bart Layton’s American Animals is a clever adaptation of a true crime involving young unconventional thieves who fear their lives are aimless.  They decide to be proactive by organizing a score that would later be known as one of the most audacious heists in U.S history.