Latest

Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit, written and directed by Taika Waititi, is a risqué movie that reminded me of classic comedies made by the legendary Mel Brooks.  The film risks being offensive to lampoon racism, including its different perspectives by persecuting followers, and to draw parallels to current arrogant behaviour thrusted upon minorities.  Waititi solves the puzzle to make his satire work, but also doesn’t distill the severity of past hate crimes in this period piece.

Reviews

Standing Up, Falling Down

Standing Up, Falling Down is a really nice dramedy about people finding and relating to each other.  It’s funny, touching, performed well, and directed with fluency by newcomer Matt Ratner.  As far as movies go about characters leaning on comedy as a crutch to hide their true emotions, the film is the best of its kind since Judd Apatow’s Funny People.

Reviews

Space & Time

There seems to be an unhealthy trend of shooting and wrapping film productions within a short time frame (A Fall from Grace, Appiness).  But for Toronto indie Space & Time, writer/director Shawn Gerrard sees the appeal of a patient process.  Space & Time has been shot over the period of 11 months;  allowing the film to naturally capture the passage of, well, space and time.  This lends a potentially special quality to the film’s story…

Reviews

21 Bridges

Black Panther’s Chadwick Boseman plays Andre Davis, a stoic NYPD detective who was psychologically affected at a young age by the murder of his father, a policeman in the line of fire.  From that tragedy, Davis developed a certain alertness to his job but the experience has made him mentally withdrawn from situations and company.  Peers are either impressed with his work or intimidated by his reputation. Davis invests all of his passion in his most…

Reviews

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Céline Sciamma’s highly acclaimed drama Portrait of a Lady on Fire is visceral filmmaking at its most eloquent.  So much of this period piece hinges on textures, sights, and sounds to make the audience believe that we’re living through someone’s romantic memories.

Reviews

Come to Daddy

Most movies build towards a crescendo, yet the first act of Ant Timpson’s Come to Daddy is the climax.  But then, instead of gradually hitting new heights, Timpson’s film simmers to a tepid temperature.  Despite the outrageous feedback you may have heard about the movie’s wild qualities, Come to Daddy is actually family tame (if you’re used to off-the-wall genre pieces).

Reviews

Code 8

Code 8 is an Indiegogo funded passion project from actors Robbie and Stephen Amell that raised over $3,000,000 (Canadian) crushing the campaign’s $200,000 goal – that’s impressive.  I learned about the crowdfunding after watching the movie, which made my appreciation for the film grow.  But, I still think Code 8 is both a tedious action/thriller and a mishmash of too many observational social commentaries.

Reviews

Countdown

Make no bones about it: writer/director Justin Dec’s contemporary cyber horror Countdown has been influenced by the Final Destination series, a franchise that toyed with ideas of existentialism and then devolved into outrageous collections of gruesome spectacles.

Reviews

Rosie

Rosie is a realistic depiction of a family experiencing sudden homelessness.  After their rented house is sold by their landlord without much time to prepare for change, daily life becomes a struggle to find a place to sleep.  Parents Rosie and John Paul (Sarah Greene, Moe Dunford) scramble to find vacancies in local hotels, keeping the truth away from their four children.