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Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

1 Mile to You

You pick up on a lot of hints when you watch enough movies.  In a screening of The Blind Side, I grasped my armrest and held my breath when two characters were happily singing while driving.  I know when that happens, an accident is right around the corner and, sure enough, there was.

Reviews

Us, Naked: Trixie & Monkey

Baltimore natives Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle are better known as their stage personas, Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey.  They perform live – usually scantily clad – while displaying different ideas of burlesque.  As expected from burlesque performances, their show is made up of risqué humour and naughty choreography.  Their innovation stems from breathtaking acrobatics that add a daring element to their otherwise innocuous entertainment.

Festival Coverage

Canadian Film Fest ’17: Modern Classic

Making a movie like Modern Classic requires film experience, and I’m not talking about knowing how to assemble a shot list.  It’s a taxing process of compromises that pulls you through the ringer while you remain hopeful and eager.  Modern Classic, a flippant film about this love/hate relationship, uses catharsis and dry humour to exhale.

Festival Coverage

Canadian Film Fest ’17: Filth City

Budding filmmaker Andy King has been in hot water with former Toronto councillor Doug Ford, the brother of late mayor Rob Ford who was caught up in worldwide controversy involving drug use caught on tape.  The plot of King’s feature Filth City is centred around a belligerent, frantic mayor searching for a video that captures his illicit drug binging at a house party – you can see why Doug is a little mad.

Reviews

It’s Not My Fault and I Don’t Care Anyway

Alan Thicke, in one of his final roles, is exceptional as self-help guru Patrick Spencer in It’s Not My Fault and I Don’t Care Anyway.  As Spencer, Thicke is expected to peddle encouraging apathy with a smile – using nothing more than charisma to make his pitch.  To think countless hosting gigs and ironic cameos didn’t prepare the entertainer for this movie would be foolish.

Reviews

Chokeslam

Following the ubiquitous trend of safe and eccentric Canadian indies, Robert Cuffley’s dramedy features quirky characters in a small town anticipating an event that’s larger than life to them, but would be a modest footnote to anyone outside of their community.

Reviews

The Last Laugh

Comedians have it good.  Just recently, they were given a master class by multiple jokesters in Dying Laughing, a doc that gave an up-close-and-personal view of comedy.  Now, they can watch The Last Laugh, a terrific documentary about how soon is “too soon”.