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Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Ruben Brandt, Collector

Art has been known to be so vivid and realistic that it can leap off the page, the canvas, et cetera.  That saying becomes quite literal for psychotherapist Ruben Brandt, who is experiencing surrealists nightmares of famous paintings torturing him.  In order to confront and conquer his fears, Brandt makes a bold choice to steal and obtain each work of art that haunts him, therefore being in full control of whatever is “out” to get…

Short Film Showcase

Short Film Showcase: ‘Ghost Beaver Kick’ and ‘The Tattooist’

Wylie Writes’ Short Film Showcase acknowledges exclusive screenings of short films across Canada.  Short-form filmmaking is sometimes overshadowed by larger projects or, worse, ignored completely.  With this showcase, Wylie Writes wishes to not only provide a unique opinion for filmmakers, but to also spread awareness of these special screenings for our loyal readers.

Reviews

1st Summoning

The “found footage” horror sub-genre has had its fair share of stinkers, but movies don’t get much lazier than 1st Summoning, an entry that seems to be as anti-audience as it is anti-climactic.  Here’s a movie that sheepishly grits its teeth, waiting for viewers to pity it.

Reviews

Never Look Away

From Academy Award winning filmmaker Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (The Lives of Others, The Tourist), Never Look Away chronicles an aspiring artist who grew up during World War II as he learns how to come to terms with his heartbreak and trauma.

Reviews

Trouble in the Garden

Possibly influenced by Rachel Getting Married and August: Osage County, writer/director Roz Owen makes her feature film debut with Trouble in the Garden, a condensed drama about a family’s black sheep returning “home” to unexpectedly face her conflicted past.

Reviews

Sharkwater: Extinction

Circling back to the achievements he made wth his breakout doc Sharkwater, filmmaker/conservationist Rob Stewart checks in in the status of sharks in his final film Sharkwater: Extinction. The documentary, however, takes on a parallel meaning because it’s not only a swan song to an endangered species, it’s also a touching goodbye to Stewart and his career in activism.