Latest

Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Family history is a dependable theme for filmmakers to explore.  The Last Black Man in San Francisco, however, is more about what it means to preserve that lineage.  In their breakout feature film debut, filmmaker Joe Talbot and actor Jimmie Fails unpack an observational story that’s related to that, based on elements of Fails’ real-life experiences.

Reviews

Hotel Mumbai

We don’t watch Hotel Mumbai, we experience it.  Filmmaker Anthony Maras makes his feature film debut with a dramatization so intense and effective that the audience has no choice but to grit their teeth and squint their eyes as they muster through the film’s realistic reenactments.  I haven’t felt that way since Paul Greengrass’ heart-wrenching portrayal of 9/11 in United 93 (2006).

Reviews

The Kid

From my experience, audiences usually like when a movie shifts into high gear right off the hop;  especially if it’s an action movie.  The Kid does just that.  Using a pair of young fugitives as a vessel for the audience, the film essentially starts in the middle of a power struggle between Pat Garrett (Ethan Hawke) and Billy ‘The Kid’ Bonney (Dane DeHaan).

Reviews

Paris Is Burning

Jennie Livingston’s award-winning documentary Paris Is Burning has received a 4K restoration twenty-eight years after its initial release, and it’ll screen in select theatres across Canada throughout the year.  I believe the re-release was planned in part to curate the footage, but also because the documentary is relevant as ever.

Reviews

T-34

Russian wartime blockbuster T-34 was a hit in its native land.  And while it’s receiving a softer release in North America, it deserves to be sought out and seen by movie goers looking for a good action movie.

Reviews

Us

Jordan Peele follows up his trailblazing, Oscar-winning debut Get Out with Us, a thriller that flips the script on Peele’s trademark storytelling.  This time, the social commentary exists behind a creepy and tense home invasion flick.

Reviews

Mouthpiece

In Mouthpiece, two women play the lead character.  Not with strategic editing or a duel Sliding Doors-esque narrative, but simultaneously on-screen.  While this may sound like an excuse for the filmmakers to showboat and earn arthouse cred, the results couldn’t be farther from being just a fancy trick.