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Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Bill & Ted Face the Music

The much awaited and presumably final instalment in the Bill & Ted series, Bill & Ted Face the Music, pulls off the impossible feat of being a faithful and charming sequel to cult classics.  For that, the production should be very proud of their efforts and patience.  However, the movie itself is neither “excellent” or “bogus”.  It’s just, sort of, “chill”.

Reviews

Steve-O: Gnarly

The title of Steve-O’s new comedy special Gnarly, as expected, describes the stunt work peppered throughout the show as he raises the bar on his own shock factor with squeamish spectacles.  However, the special should almost be titled Mea Culpa considering his stand-up routine, while off-the-wall, is holding his past destructive behaviour in contempt.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Kris Rey

I Used to Go Here works as a coming-of-age story, a college comedy, and a self-reflective character piece.  While the cast and crew deserve credit for how well the film pulls off this hat trick, writer/director Kris Rey is the glue holding this project together.  With her latest film, Rey continues to prove her expertise in characterization and intentionally awkward comedy, and how magic can be made when those two elements are perfectly mixed together. I recently…

Reviews

Enter the Fat Dragon

For a film titled Enter the Fat Dragon, the film doesn’t stew in heavyweight humour or reminisce on kung-fu nostalgia.  When it does, it’s brief and appropriately justified for the story.  A breath of fresh air when compared to other comedies that cash in on references and obvious prosthetics.

Reviews

Battle Scars

I don’t think it’s always required for a filmmaker to have an opinion about war if their movie is about war. Sometimes, the movie simply exists to entertain or educate about a significant historical event. But, if a filmmaker was to tell a story about the effects of war (primarily the long-term psychological impact), I feel like the filmmaker should use the platform to send a message about the value of combat.

Reviews

Unhinged

Russell Crowe gives an absolutely terrifying performance in Unhinged.  The film is a high-octane, single day thriller, but there are times when Derrick Borte’s movie is a straight-up horror because of Crowe.  As the story’s antagonist Tom Cooper, Crowe ditches his inhibitions.  He’s purposely underdeveloped to build an aura of mystery and terror.  The audience is given minor clues of who Tom could be, but he still resembles a stranger;  someone who could break under…

Reviews

She Dies Tomorrow

The title She Dies Tomorrow refers to a line spoken by the film’s lead character Amy (Kate Lyn Sheil) to her sister Jane (Jane Adams) early on in the movie.  Jane shrugs it off, but then slowly becomes obsessed by the possibility that she too could die tomorrow.  She goes to a birthday party where she passes on her distressed theory to a group of four (Chris Messina, Katie Aselton, Jennifer Kim, and Tunde Adebimpe),…

Reviews

The Booksellers

Just as California Typewriter taught us about the cult culture about its title antique, The Booksellers is an equally nifty-and-thrifty doc about the history and culture behind collecting and preserving literature.