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Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Bigger

Bigger is an abysmal biopic about the Weider brothers, Joe and Ben, which is unfortunate because the world of fitness is due for an engrossing movie.  Not a flabby flick like this.

Reviews

Strange Nature

Some will compare Strange Nature to Eli Roth’s Cabin Fever based on a glance at the film’s premise about a deadly outbreak.  Others, including myself, will find the flick to be a fitting throwback to a brand of vintage cinema that gave audiences thrills and chills yet remained ambiguous about its genre.  Is it a horror?  A thriller?  And, does the plot act as a parable for a real-life disaster?  In the same way Godzilla…

Reviews

Let the Corpses Tan

While Let the Corpses Tan tells a thin tale about thieves on the run, it’s nothing short of complex in terms of visual storytelling.  Using – quite possibly – the best edits I’ve seen in a movie this year, Belgian directors/screenwriters Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani (The ABC’s of Death) offer audiences pure entertainment that works as both a western and a crime-thriller.

Reviews

The First Purge

The Purge wasn’t a typical horror film.  It was an intense bottle film that found ways to give movie goers the heebie-jeebies by poking holes in assumably safe conditions.  It also showcased nimble newcomer James DeMonaco, a skillful director who could use paranoia and predictability to deliver an engrossing movie.  DeMonaco directed the next two Purge movies – films I never saw but I’ve been eager to catch up with.  Hopefully, those films are better…

Reviews

Lizzie

Lizzie is a decent psychological slow burn, but its problematic pacing leaves me wondering if the film could’ve been stronger had it been workshopped more.  With his second feature film, director Craig William Macneill demonstrates his ability to build tension through taut silences and piercing instrumentals.  However, Bryce Kass’ script doesn’t match the filmmaker’s patience.

Reviews

Assassination Nation

Reviewing movies can be such a subjective experience.  Sure, I’m writing about my feelings towards the film and how it affected me, but I also have to keep in mind that an audience – completely different to myself – may engage with it more.

Reviews

Fahrenheit 11/9

While it may appear as a sole sequel to Michael Moore’s 2004 hit documentary Fahrenheit 9/11, Fahrenheit 11/9 is also a spiritual, updated follow-up to some of Moore’s other movies.  Movie goers will notice hints of Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore in TrumpLand, and Sicko as the Oscar-winning documentarian covers gun control, political divides, and the health and safety of Flint, Michigan’s water supply in this provocative presidential exposé.

Reviews

Love, Gilda

Love, Gilda captures the spirit and energy of comedienne Gilda Radner.  That achievement alone makes Lisa Dapolito’s documentary a success.  What makes the film particularly exceptional though is how it duals as a recap of Radner’s life, and as a master class in comedy.

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival ’18

The Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a variety of well-realized works, made by young filmmakers worth keeping watch for.  The festival’s whopping total of 47 films are split into four programmes – the kids presentation Sparks (screening on September 21), followed by Forging Our Own Discourse, Moving Forward, and Searching For Belonging (screening, in order, on September 22).

Reviews

Mandy

Using brilliantly ominous visuals and an amazingly unsettling musical score, Panos Cosmatos’ Mandy serves up a simple story that isn’t on the same level of competence as those technical achievements.  Cage and Andrea Riseborough (The Death of Stalin) play Red and Mandy, a soft-spoken bohemian couple who are suddenly captured and tortured by a travelling crew of cultists.  When his girlfriend is kidnapped and used as a pawn for a “special” ritual, Red has no other desire…