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Wylie Writes

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Meeting Gorbachev

I don’t take umbrage with why Werner Herzog and André Singer made a documentary about former Soviet Union president Mikhail Gorbachev.  Considering how elated both filmmakers are when they’re on screen with Gorbachev, the audience can see how much interest they have in this passion project.  However, I feel that their starstruck smokescreen stunted this project from resembling a movie worth watching.

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The Poison Rose

P.I Carson Philips (John Travolta) accepts a missing persons case that returns him to his hometown.  Reminding movie goers of Walking Tall, Philips observes that his old stomping ground is unlike how he remembers it, which leads into an overlapping conspiracy involving the recent murder of a star high school quarterback.

Reviews

Sorry for Your Loss

By: Trevor Chartrand In Sorry for Your Loss, a humble everyman with a dead-end job (Justin Bartha), learns of his estranged father’s death shortly after the birth of his own son.  In order to claim a sizable inheritance, he’s tasked with spreading his father’s ashes on the playing field of his dad’s favorite football team.  The closer Ken (Bartha) gets to the stadium though, the more he learns about his dad and the pathetic legacy…

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Aniara

If you prefer science fiction to be grim, perhaps Pella Kågerman and Hugo Lilja’s Aniara will be your “thing”.  Although I can’t comment on the film’s faithfulness to its source material (Harry Martinson’s Nobel prize winning poem of the same name), Aniara is very good in terms of riveting near-future sci-fi, but it’s definitely for a specific crowd.

Reviews

I’m Going to Break Your Heart

By: Trevor Chartrand I’m Going to Break Your Heart is an observational documentary that explores the relationship between Canadian indie-rock legend Raine Maida and his Juno-Award winning wife Chantal Kreviazuk as they collaborate on their first album together.  The couple struggles as all couples do, with the added challenges and frustrations of working together to create art as a team.

Reviews

Drunk Parents

Fred Wolf and Peter Gaulke have a calling for slacker comedy, though their sense of humour hasn’t been well-received.  They collaborated on Happy Madison’s Strange Wilderness, and while that film is pitiful, it’s also exactly what it set out to be – a scrappy stoner comedy conceived by a crew of people who must’ve been on heavy hallucinogens during the making-of.  In that sense, it finds success as a guilty pleasure that willingly goes in some weird…