Wylie Writes

Reviews

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Jutta Brendemühl

The primary of objective of Goethe Films is to bring German cinema and television to Canadian audiences.  Though the series is known for showcasing contemporary art house film, the selection this October is of a slightly different flavour.  On October 4th, Goethe Films will host the exclusive Canadian premiere of Bad Banks, a co-produced German-Luxembourgish mini-series.  I had to opportunity to chat with Jutta Brendemühl, curator of the Goethe Films series, about Bad Banks, and…

Reviews

The First Purge

The Purge wasn’t a typical horror film.  It was an intense bottle film that found ways to give movie goers the heebie-jeebies by poking holes in assumably safe conditions.  It also showcased nimble newcomer James DeMonaco, a skillful director who could use paranoia and predictability to deliver an engrossing movie.  DeMonaco directed the next two Purge movies – films I never saw but I’ve been eager to catch up with.  Hopefully, those films are better…

Reviews

Bad Banks

Numbers aren’t my thing;  I never enjoyed math in school and thinking about RRSP’s makes me want to take a nap.  Yet only two episodes into creator Oliver Kienle’s financial thriller, Bad Banks, I found myself completely immersed in the twists and turns of the high-stakes world of investment banking.

Reviews

My Generation

By: Jessica Goddard Half documentary, half pet project from Michael Caine, My Generation is vaguely informative but mostly a colourful nostalgia trip to 1960s creative hotspot London.  The film arcs from explaining the roots of the culturally significant music, fashion, and photography of young London in the 60s to imparting what happened when those same tastemakers dove headfirst into vice (Caine told The Guardian in a recent interview, “What ruined the 60s, towards the end…

Reviews

Minding the Gap

By: Trevor Chartrand First-time director Bing Liu shows some real promise with his highly personal and reflective documentary, Minding the Gap.  Viewers watching may find themselves concerned early on, especially since the film appears to focus on a group of skater burn-outs and their quest to get drunk.  However, the doc challenges those expectations and quickly proves to be a profound examination of their troubled lives.

Reviews

Lizzie

Lizzie is a decent psychological slow burn, but its problematic pacing leaves me wondering if the film could’ve been stronger had it been workshopped more.  With his second feature film, director Craig William Macneill demonstrates his ability to build tension through taut silences and piercing instrumentals.  However, Bryce Kass’ script doesn’t match the filmmaker’s patience.

Reviews

Assassination Nation

Reviewing movies can be such a subjective experience.  Sure, I’m writing about my feelings towards the film and how it affected me, but I also have to keep in mind that an audience – completely different to myself – may engage with it more.

Reviews

Fahrenheit 11/9

While it may appear as a sole sequel to Michael Moore’s 2004 hit documentary Fahrenheit 9/11, Fahrenheit 11/9 is also a spiritual, updated follow-up to some of Moore’s other movies.  Movie goers will notice hints of Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore in TrumpLand, and Sicko as the Oscar-winning documentarian covers gun control, political divides, and the health and safety of Flint, Michigan’s water supply in this provocative presidential exposé.

Reviews

Love, Gilda

Love, Gilda captures the spirit and energy of comedienne Gilda Radner.  That achievement alone makes Lisa Dapolito’s documentary a success.  What makes the film particularly exceptional though is how it duals as a recap of Radner’s life, and as a master class in comedy.

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival ’18

The Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a variety of well-realized works, made by young filmmakers worth keeping watch for.  The festival’s whopping total of 47 films are split into four programmes – the kids presentation Sparks (screening on September 21), followed by Forging Our Own Discourse, Moving Forward, and Searching For Belonging (screening, in order, on September 22).