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German

Reviews

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Jutta Brendemühl

The primary of objective of Goethe Films is to bring German cinema and television to Canadian audiences.  Though the series is known for showcasing contemporary art house film, the selection this October is of a slightly different flavour.  On October 4th, Goethe Films will host the exclusive Canadian premiere of Bad Banks, a co-produced German-Luxembourgish mini-series.  I had to opportunity to chat with Jutta Brendemühl, curator of the Goethe Films series, about Bad Banks, and…

Events

Wylie Writes @ Ulrike Ottinger in Asia

All of us should occasionally stop and consider how lucky we are to have the TIFF Bell Lightbox.  On top of the populist arthouse fare that populates the majority of their schedule, the Lightbox occasionally introduces a brand-new audience to underrated, underappreciated, or simply underseen filmmakers.  The latest addition to this tradition is the Goethe Institute-curated mini-retrospective, Ulrike Ottinger in Asia;  a program of four features, three of which are Ottinger’s celebrations of various Asian cultures (the…

Reviews

Morris from America

There’s a scene in Chad Hartigan’s Morris from America where its title character Morris (Markees Christmas) asks his German tutor (Carla Juri) if she can teach him to be charming.  That’s an ironic moment for the audience who fully understands just how damn charming the film is.

Reviews

The Grand Budapest Hotel

By: Addison Wylie Audiences can witness Wes Anderson going through filmmaking periods.  We’re not exactly sure what’s triggering these changes of pace, but those willing to follow the whimsical auteur don’t regret the trip. As of late, Anderson has been wearing his French influences on his sleeve – or, rather across his forehead.  He made the transition with The Fantastic Mr. Fox and then went full-tilt Français with his highly acclaimed Moonrise Kingdom; nodding towards…

Reviews

The German Doctor

By: Addison Wylie The German Doctor (or its Spanish title, Wakolda) is a solid slow burn.  It’s also a not-so-slow slow burn.  Allow me to explain. It appears this film about a relocating Argentine family who is followed by an unknown yet concerned doctor would like to move at a more patient rate.  The actors on screen are prepared to show their unease with properly drawn out weariness and filmmaker Lucía Puenzo shows he has the chops to tackle…