Reviews

Sunset

Sunset is the disaster movie audiences had no idea they needed.  Instead of overreaching for thrilling spectacles, director Jamison M. LoCascio presents a subdued, dialogue-driven film featuring a relatable cast of characters reacting and adapting to a critical state of emergency.

Reviews

Uncle Drew

By: Graeme Howard Considering the fact that Uncle Drew originated as a Pepsi advertisement campaign, it is surprising that the film is not a complete and utter train wreck.  Instead viewers are treated to a passable film that will appeal to NBA fans.  However the abundance of product placements and issues with pacing lead to a largely by-the-book film that misses more than it dunks.

Reviews

In Darkness

By: Leah Kuperman In Darkness stars a blind protagonist who gets caught in the violent crimes of the London underground.  Writer/director Anthony Byrne (BBC’s Peaky Blinders) offers viewers a gripping film with ample twists and turns but most interesting, however, was the way his movie portrayed the life and disability of its protagonist.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Sook-Yin Lee

Sook-Yin Lee is currently mystifying Toronto movie goers with her long-awaited return to feature-length filmmaking.  Octavio is Dead! gradually reels us in with a dream-like allure as we observe Tyler (Sarah Gadon) rediscover herself through the death of her absent father (Raoul Max Trujillo).  From there, Lee strings her audience on a winding narrative that consistently maintains a personal intimacy throughout its run.

Reviews

Hearts Beat Loud

There seems to be a new trend where every Summer, audiences receive a musically-savvy indie.  Two years ago, movie goers relished in Sing Street, followed by Patti Cake$ the year after.  This season, move goers will be put under a spell by Hearts Beat Loud, an effortlessly charming and heartwarming dramedy from writer/director Brett Haley (The Hero).

Reviews

Octavio Is Dead!

Pardon me for sounding blasé, but I can’t help but clench when a Canadian film makes supernatural suggestions.  Other than the odd exception (A Sunday Kind of Love), these are ideas that are usually squandered of their potential (Considering Love & Other Magic).  Imagine my surprise in Octavio Is Dead!, the latest filmmaking effort from Shortbus actor Sook-Yin Lee, when the writer/director treaded familiar ground but drove her film in a darker direction;  blending different…

Reviews

Paper Year

Fleeting moments of marital bliss is the subject of Rebecca Addelman’s Paper Year, a film that explores the tumultuous first year of marriage between two millennials living precariously in Los Angeles.  Although largely sympathetic to its central couple, Paper Year often feels like it would have more potential as a cautionary tale for young lovers trying to make it big in the entertainment industry.  Though, perhaps it is the balance between sympathy and cautionary that…

Reviews

The Lockpicker

A teenager’s public suicide sends shockwaves through their high school, as students and teachers alike reel and cope.  On the fringe of the tragedy is Hashi, a shy creative writer who had a close friendship with the victim.  Being generally shy and uncomfortable to begin with, Hashi – despite finding an emotional connection through poetry – doesn’t know how to exhale his pain.  Unfortunately, he chooses ways to grieve that are detrimental to his life.

Reviews

Tag

By: Nick van Dinther A great ensemble cast requires actors to seamlessly fit together, while simultaneously bringing their own uniqueness to the story and to their character.  It’s a crucial key that Tag gets right, and it’s the main reason why this movie is so much fun.