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The Assistant

The Assistant is a faithful portrayal of workplace harassment. Drawing from her experience as a documentarian (Ukraine Is Not a Brothel), writer/director Kitty Green brings layers of realism which she channels well through her actors. I think Green’s vision is admirable, but I completely understand if audiences feel disregarded watching the movie.

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Robert the Bruce

Intended as a sequel, of sorts, to Braveheart, Robert the Bruce sees Angus MacFadyen (Braveheart, Alive) reprise his role as the titular Scottish king.  Unfortunately, this is one of those movies with all the right ingredients – but no spark.

Reviews

Extra Ordinary

Extra Ordinary, a horror-comedy from Irish filmmakers Mike Ahern and Enda Loughman, is loaded with ideas, concepts, and gags.  But while these bits are funny individually, they don’t collectively contribute to an overarching story.

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The Half of It

Two years ago, I seemed to be on the wrong side of the tracks when discussing Netflix’s bubblegum teen movie To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before. Everyone threw their arms around it, except for me who thought teenagers deserved a smarter movie. Excuse my déjà vu as I find myself in the same dilemma. The reviews are in for Netflix’s latest fluffy flick The Half of It and people find it endearing, except for…

Reviews

A Secret Love

Chris Bolan’s documentary A Secret Love is a sweet tearjerker that explores the nearly 70-year relationship between ex-All American Girls Professional Baseball League player Terry Donahue and her loyal partner Pat Henschel.

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The Song of Names

It was both surprising and unsurprising to find out director François Girard was attached to The Song of Names.  By going into the movie blind, so much of Girard’s film reminded me of the Oscar winning drama The Red Violin.  This discovery that both films were directed by the same person made sense, but I didn’t expect The Song of Names to pale so much in comparison.

Reviews

The Willoughbys

The Willoughbys tries to straddle the line between being playfully grim and downright bizarre but, instead, alternates from being one or the other.  Based on Lois Lowry’s children’s book and evoking memories of stranger family fare like James and the Giant Peach, Matilda, and Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Willoughbys is a unique endeavour that will make you laugh as much as it will straight-up weird you out.