Reviews

Pavarotti

Pavarotti is a celebration of Luciano Pavarotti’s career and his achievements as a legendary opera singer and performer.  Ron Howard’s documentary is jovial, just as Pavarotti was known to be.  As someone who had limited knowledge of the timeless tenor, I walked away from Howard’s enlightening documentary with a new appreciation for music.

Reviews

Framing John DeLorean

By: Trevor Chartrand Framing John DeLorean is a unique documentary about the man behind one of most iconic car designs in automobile history.  Much like John DeLorean himself, the film takes some big risks with an interesting and flashy approach.  Many of DeLorean’s risks did not pay off, and the same can be said for some things in this film.

Articles

40 Seasons Later: 10 Years of ‘After Last Season’

By: Trevor Chartrand On their anniversary, successful films often get a special edition re-release that includes new bonus features, interviews, and a high-def restoration that celebrates the film’s impact and longevity.  With a film like 2009’s After Last Season, however, the tenth anniversary brings us nothing but bootlegs and a handful of rare DVDs that sell for $300 online.

Reviews

Meeting Gorbachev

I don’t take umbrage with why Werner Herzog and André Singer made a documentary about former Soviet Union president Mikhail Gorbachev.  Considering how elated both filmmakers are when they’re on screen with Gorbachev, the audience can see how much interest they have in this passion project.  However, I feel that their starstruck smokescreen stunted this project from resembling a movie worth watching.

Reviews

The Poison Rose

P.I Carson Philips (John Travolta) accepts a missing persons case that returns him to his hometown.  Reminding movie goers of Walking Tall, Philips observes that his old stomping ground is unlike how he remembers it, which leads into an overlapping conspiracy involving the recent murder of a star high school quarterback.

Reviews

Sorry for Your Loss

By: Trevor Chartrand In Sorry for Your Loss, a humble everyman with a dead-end job (Justin Bartha), learns of his estranged father’s death shortly after the birth of his own son.  In order to claim a sizable inheritance, he’s tasked with spreading his father’s ashes on the playing field of his dad’s favorite football team.  The closer Ken (Bartha) gets to the stadium though, the more he learns about his dad and the pathetic legacy…

Reviews

Aniara

If you prefer science fiction to be grim, perhaps Pella Kågerman and Hugo Lilja’s Aniara will be your “thing”.  Although I can’t comment on the film’s faithfulness to its source material (Harry Martinson’s Nobel prize winning poem of the same name), Aniara is very good in terms of riveting near-future sci-fi, but it’s definitely for a specific crowd.