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Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘Prospect’ and ‘The Ranger’

Prospect (DIR. Chris Caldwell, Zeek Earl) First, we lived through “mumblecore”.  Then, we were subjected to “mumblegore”.  Now, it seems like the next logical step is to “mumblego” where no man has gone before.  Case in point: Chris Caldwell and Zeek Earl’s exercise in furious navel-gazing, Prospect, a film so enamored by its own cleverness that it manages to make its modest runtime seem endless.  A film whose total lack of direction in favour of world-building…

Reviews

The Oath

Out of everyone in Hollywood, I least expected comedian Ike Barinholtz (The Mindy Project, Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising, Blockers) to write and direct an impassionately-charged social satire that hilariously addresses today’s disturbing political divide.

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘I’ll Take Your Dead’ and ‘Mega Time Squad’

I’ll Take Your Dead (DIR. Chad Archibald) The multi-hyphen horror film is just a concept that is here to stay.  Despite everything being a hyphenated genre lately, very few films actually know how to do it well.  The issue is that these films are often so lost in their own muddled genres, that they forget to specialize in one.  Very rarely can someone pull off an actually balanced hyphenated genre film, leading to practical magic when…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘The Inhabitant’ and ‘Tigers Are Not Afraid’

The Inhabitant (DIR. Guillermo Amoedo) Latin American cinema is in the middle of a great resurgence, creating some of the best works since the cinemas of poverty of the 1960s.  On another hand, there has been an influx of supernatural home invasion films: thieves having to deal with demons who won’t let them leave, a torrent which deemed any new arrivals in the genre mundane.  Using this dichotomy, one is left to wonder what the…

Reviews

Bigger

Bigger is an abysmal biopic about the Weider brothers, Joe and Ben, which is unfortunate because the world of fitness is due for an engrossing movie.  Not a flabby flick like this.

Reviews

Strange Nature

Some will compare Strange Nature to Eli Roth’s Cabin Fever based on a glance at the film’s premise about a deadly outbreak.  Others, including myself, will find the flick to be a fitting throwback to a brand of vintage cinema that gave audiences thrills and chills yet remained ambiguous about its genre.  Is it a horror?  A thriller?  And, does the plot act as a parable for a real-life disaster?  In the same way Godzilla…

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Let the Corpses Tan

While Let the Corpses Tan tells a thin tale about thieves on the run, it’s nothing short of complex in terms of visual storytelling.  Using – quite possibly – the best edits I’ve seen in a movie this year, Belgian directors/screenwriters Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani (The ABC’s of Death) offer audiences pure entertainment that works as both a western and a crime-thriller.

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The Old Man & the Gun

By: Trevor Chartrand Part romance, part crime-drama, The Old Man & the Gun is the gripping, yet low-key, story of notorious bank robber Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford).  Based on the true story of a life-long criminal and prison escape artist, the film examines Tucker as a unique breed of villain.  Always calm and in control – but not in the suave, Ocean’s 11 type of way.  When Tucker robs a bank, he’s simply courteous, polite,…