Latest

June 2018

Reviews

Hearts Beat Loud

There seems to be a new trend where every Summer, audiences receive a musically-savvy indie.  Two years ago, movie goers relished in Sing Street, followed by Patti Cake$ the year after.  This season, move goers will be put under a spell by Hearts Beat Loud, an effortlessly charming and heartwarming dramedy from writer/director Brett Haley (The Hero).

Reviews

Octavio Is Dead!

Pardon me for sounding blasé, but I can’t help but clench when a Canadian film makes supernatural suggestions.  Other than the odd exception (A Sunday Kind of Love), these are ideas that are usually squandered of their potential (Considering Love & Other Magic).  Imagine my surprise in Octavio Is Dead!, the latest filmmaking effort from Shortbus actor Sook-Yin Lee, when the writer/director treaded familiar ground but drove her film in a darker direction;  blending different…

Reviews

Paper Year

Fleeting moments of marital bliss is the subject of Rebecca Addelman’s Paper Year, a film that explores the tumultuous first year of marriage between two millennials living precariously in Los Angeles.  Although largely sympathetic to its central couple, Paper Year often feels like it would have more potential as a cautionary tale for young lovers trying to make it big in the entertainment industry.  Though, perhaps it is the balance between sympathy and cautionary that…

Reviews

The Lockpicker

A teenager’s public suicide sends shockwaves through their high school, as students and teachers alike reel and cope.  On the fringe of the tragedy is Hashi, a shy creative writer who had a close friendship with the victim.  Being generally shy and uncomfortable to begin with, Hashi – despite finding an emotional connection through poetry – doesn’t know how to exhale his pain.  Unfortunately, he chooses ways to grieve that are detrimental to his life.

Reviews

Tag

By: Nick van Dinther A great ensemble cast requires actors to seamlessly fit together, while simultaneously bringing their own uniqueness to the story and to their character.  It’s a crucial key that Tag gets right, and it’s the main reason why this movie is so much fun.

Reviews

The Hurricane Heist

In January, I declared Monolith as one of the dumbest movies I’d have ever seen;  despite it being an entertaining flick.  I secretly felt that no other movie released in 2018 could top its foolishness.  Little did I know Rob Cohen’s disaster movie The Hurricane Heist was waiting around the corner, ready to blow me away.

Reviews

The Accountant of Auschwitz

The Accountant of Auschwitz proposes a moral dilemma about whether to follow through convicting a 94-year-old man with crimes against humanity for contributing to the horrors of the Auschwitz death camp. The man in question, former SS guard Oskar Gröning, is physically frail, stoic, and would undoubtably live out his final years in prison, but are these current details relevant when discussing justice for 300,000 people who were murdered for their culture?

Reviews

Alex Strangelove

Craig Johnson (director/co-writer of The Skeleton Twins) returns with another sweet story about solving personal ambiguity with wonder, caution, and experience in Netflix’s Alex Strangelove.  This time, the angst takes place in high school, as Johnson evolves the “teen sex comedy” sub-genre with positive (and current) messages of sexual orientation.