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Sci-Fi

Reviews

Nope

Jordan Peele has quickly proven to be a filmmaker with a lot on his mind, which he then translates effortlessly to the screen.  His intelligent writing for Get Out earned him an Oscar, and Us convinced audiences that Peele’s feature-length debut wasn’t just a fluke.  Peele’s third film, Nope, allows the writer/director to expand his scope;  both with his screenwriting and as a visual storyteller.

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2022: ‘The Lair’

Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, Doomsday, Hellboy) knows how to make a horror film.  The writer/director is responsible for the early 2000’s cult classic The Descent, a film that has been praised for its mature characterization of a group of women (a relatively novel concept, as far as early ’00s horror was concerned).  In addition to its dramatic and psychological elements, The Descent was also freaking terrifying.  Even the toughest, most hardened horror fans are quick to admit…

Reviews

Blank

Natalie Kennedy’s Blank is the latest addition to the “tech gone wrong” sci-fi sub-genre.  This time: an A.I. controlled retreat goes awry after a malware infection traps a creatively-stunted writer, Claire (Rachel Shelley), until they can finish their book.  However, the malfunction triggers a loop causing Claire’s “ideal” assistant, Rita (Heida Reed), to frequently reset and welcome in unpredictable and dangerous mechanical quirks.

Reviews

Crimes of the Future

As much as I would love to compare David Cronenberg’s Crimes of the Future to his earlier horrors, I’m afraid I’m unqualified because I haven’t seen enough of that catalogue.  However, I can see a contrast between the Canadian’s long-awaited return to filmmaking and his other recent dramatic work such as A History of Violence, Eastern Promises, and A Dangerous Method – all of which also star Viggo Mortensen.  Crimes of the Future, a gruesome…

Reviews

Slash/Back

While I’m not head-over-heels for Slash/Back, Nyla Innuksuk’s lil’ sci-fi that could, I don’t want the filmmaker to be discouraged by my review.  It’s best described as a Northern Canadian Attack The Block, which is an incredible compliment.

Reviews

Dual

Dual is a nifty near-future sci-fi that starts with an interesting and obviously satirical premise and elevates it to make comments on the dire state of personal interactivity.  It’s well-trodden territory for this genre, but writer/director Riley Stearns (The Art of Self-Defense) still finds original ways to keep his audience laughing, entertained, and on their toes.

Reviews

After Yang

After Yang chronicles the in-between of a family tragedy. Set in the not-so-distant future (similar to Spike Jonze’s Her), an assistive android named Yang (Justin H. Min, in one of this year’s strongest supporting roles) suddenly malfunctions. Yang’s assigned family are shaken up as they grasp for an action plan. The search for a satisfying resolution falls on the father, Jake (Colin Farrell), who slowly discovers more of Yang’s purpose as he shops around for repair…

Reviews

The Adam Project

Watching The Adam Project is like watching someone fall down stairs.  The movie stands steadily, stumbles, picks itself back up, and repeats that same process until the film is so exhausted with itself that it doesn’t bother to pull itself together.