Articles by Addison Wylie

Reviews

Drunk Parents

Fred Wolf and Peter Gaulke have a calling for slacker comedy, though their sense of humour hasn’t been well-received.  They collaborated on Happy Madison’s Strange Wilderness, and while that film is pitiful, it’s also exactly what it set out to be – a scrappy stoner comedy conceived by a crew of people who must’ve been on heavy hallucinogens during the making-of.  In that sense, it finds success as a guilty pleasure that willingly goes in some weird…

Reviews

Ask Dr. Ruth

Ryan White’s The Case Against 8, while very good, was a straightforward example of the documentary genre’s expectations – the film explained a controversial issue, gave a platform to those opposing it, and gave viewers an uplifting feeling about an encouraging future.  White’s latest doc Ask Dr. Ruth, while also very good, is different.  It presents facts in a way that’s much more personable.

Reviews

This Is North Preston

This Is North Preston is a spinning top.  One moment, you’ll have your mind made up about what the documentary is presenting only to have your opinion changed a few more times.  I was so gobsmacked by the end that I was almost inclined to rewatch the film to see if my opinion would change again – I dare you to find a more riveting documentary than this.

Reviews

Ordinary Days

A feature-length story being dissected into individual short films is a concept full of possibilities, only to be expanded on when three filmmakers sign up to shape the narrative.  Canadian thriller Ordinary Days take a swing at this challenge but, unfortunately, produces weak results.

Reviews

Breakthrough

Breakthrough will make you believe.  While movie goers devout to Christianity may immediately apply that statement to the film’s faith-based structure, Roxann Dawson’s movie reenforced my belief in the kindness of people.

Festival Coverage

Hot Docs 2019: ‘Assholes: A Theory’

Assholes: A Theory (DIR. John Walker) After being inspired by Aaron James’ book Assholes: A Theory, documentarian/cinematographer John Walker set out to make a movie of the same name that would explore the lifestyle of the supremely arrogant.  The results are fairly satisfying, more or less, but it’s hard to make a case that the film is focused.