Reviews

Reviews

211

Though it may be a schlocky action movie, I don’t have distain towards 211.  Mostly because there’s something oddly endearing about a low-rent flick that doesn’t let up on its action sequences.

Reviews

Birds of Passage

Filmmakers Cristina Gallego and Ciro Guerra follow-up their Oscar nominated feature film Embrace of the Serpent with Birds of Passage, a sprawling drama about Columbian drug cartels.  The story’s primary focus is Raphayet (José Acosta), an average bachelor who becomes involved with drug trafficking, gradually becoming a notorious name in the dangerous culture.

Reviews

Amy Schumer: Growing

Comedienne Amy Schumer is at her best when she’s in unfamiliar waters and vocalizing about it.  By being incredibly observant and quick-witted, she forms a unique and bold perspective that humorously addresses relatable hesitation.  This transferable approach is why her film roles have worked for me as well (Trainwreck, Snatched, I Feel Pretty).

Reviews

For Love or Money

The selling point of For Love or Money is the outrageous premise that’s established well in the trailer.  It offers a familiar dynamic, but is so suggestive towards the film’s comedic potential that viewers are naturally reeled in.  If you enjoyed How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days or What Happens in Vegas, here’s a movie for you.

Reviews

Woman at War

Benedikt Erlingsson must be a gambling man.  With his new film Woman at War, he pushes the limit on imagination;  crossing the narrative with elements of a thriller and a deadpan comedy.  But like a gambler with no self-control, Erlingsson overestimates his luck;  spinning the film’s results into a somewhat smug affair.

Reviews

Ghost Town Anthology

The work I’ve seen from French-Canadian filmmaker Denis Côté all involve the subject of lost souls.  Carcasses was a pseudo-doc about a lonely scrapyard owner who is suddenly interrupted by a gang of wanderers, and Curling followed the faded relationship between a father and his daughter in the wake of a tragedy.

Reviews

To Dust

By: Trevor Chartrand A surprising and VERY unique take on the buddy-comedy, To Dust is a thoughtful and inspired look at grief – with plenty of well-timed comedic wit.  It’s a premise we’ve all heard before, with two unlikely companions teaming up to reach a common goal, however the approach and style this film takes is a brand entirely its own.

Reviews

Finding Hygge

Finding Hygge explores the Danish concept of hygge, which a quick Google search tells me has to do with comfort, wellness, and happiness.  I was forced to Google, because at no point in this ninety-minute long documentary is the concept distilled or defined in a coherent manner.