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Wylie Writes

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The Shape of Water

By: Trevor Chartrand Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water is a masterfully crafted modern-day fairy tale.  An incredible, romanticized take on the creature feature, director/co-writer del Toro seamlessly combines genre and visual style to bring us this beautifully bizarre morality tale.

Reviews

Dim the Fluorescents

Dim the Fluorescents is a fast and furious masterclass in deadpan comedy.  Its filmmaker, Daniel Warth, knows this and doesn’t miss an opportunity to make an uncomfortably honest comment about creative communities, or portray convoluted art – no matter how ridiculous it is – as believable impassioned labours of love.

Reviews

The Shape of Water

By: Nick van Dinther There are certain directors that have a specific style audiences can always identify – Quentin Tarantino, Wes Anderson, Tim Burton to name a few.  Guillermo del Toro (The Devil’s Backbone, Pan’s Labyrinth) is surely a part of that crew.  When it comes to The Shape of Water, del Toro’s style is out in full-force to bring us an unforgettable visual spectacle.

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The Other Side of Hope

Directed, written, and produced by Finnish filmmaker Aki Kaurismäki (Le Havre, The Man Without a Past), The Other Side of Hope is a timely and oddly touching comedic drama that manages to combine artistry and humour with wry social commentary.

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Wonder Wheel

By: Jessica Goddard Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel is colourful, melodramatic, deliciously tacky cinematic theatre driven by an intriguing premise and infused with refreshing nostalgia.  It’s visually delightful, and the quirky setting and quirkier characters sustain curiosity even if those characters don’t feel totally real.

Reviews

The Dancer

Stephanie Di Giusto’s The Dancer is one of the more interesting biopics in recent memory.  It’s by the book in terms of the genre’s formula and narrative structure but Di Giusto finds another way to look at her film’s biographical material.

Reviews

Big Time

Big Time does a good job acknowledging the genius of Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, even if the documentary lacks modesty.  However, I felt distance between myself and Ingels, and director Kaspar Astrup Schröder wasn’t doing anything to mend this gap.