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The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Family history is a dependable theme for filmmakers to explore.  The Last Black Man in San Francisco, however, is more about what it means to preserve that lineage.  In their breakout feature film debut, filmmaker Joe Talbot and actor Jimmie Fails unpack an observational story that’s related to that, based on elements of Fails’ real-life experiences.

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Acquainted

Acquainted is the type of indie that wants to say something profound about romance.  Little does writer/director Natty Zavitz know, dozens of other movies have beat him to the punch.

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We

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Mani Nasry has made a very personal film with We, and it’s certainly commendable, brave even, to see how transparent this young director has been in making the film – I suspect we’re getting a deep look into his mind, his personal philosophies and hardships.  Nasry and his crew deserve a lot of respect for what their film is trying to do – however the finished product is far from flawless.

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The Miseducation of Cameron Post

As people grow up, ideas are suggested to them from various sources to help craft their life in a certain way.  However with The Miseducation of Cameron Post, co-writer/director Desiree Akhavan makes an argument about the search for personal individuality which is not only liberating, but absolutely valid.  Adapting Emily M. Danforth’s novel of the same name, Akhavan shows audiences that no matter what customs or beliefs are enforced onto another person, their voice and personality…

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Prodigals

By: Trevor Chartrand Michelle Ouellet’s Prodigals depicts a feeling as much as a narrative.  Based on a stage play of the same name, the film is about a group of 20-somethings reflecting on their lives, and coming to terms with the emptiness staring back at them.  While it may sound bleak and unsettling, the film isn’t without a few shimmering rays of hope.

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Hell’s Kitty

Hell’s Kitty, a film that has been assembled from a web series of the same name conceived by writer/director Nicholas Tana, makes for an amusing in-joke for horror hounds.  The cameos alone from iconic character actors are enough to make those fans beam.  For instance, The Hills Have Eyes’ Michael Berryman appears as a testy detective, while Heir’s Bill Oberst Jr. and The Shape of Water’s Doug Jones star as a devout duo who attempt to exorcize…