Horror

Reviews

The Quiet Ones

By: Addison Wylie By this point, you pay to see The Quiet Ones and sort of know it’s going to be the fifty-seventh by-the-numbers possession film you’ve seen within the past decade.  You get a vibe that the film is riding off the success of other, more successful horror films and a lot of the scares will be abiding by the rules of “gotcha” spooks. The Quiet Ones reminded me of movies like The Conjuring…

Reviews

As Above, So Below

By: Addison Wylie I thought As Above, So Below was very, very dumb.  And, I’m someone who throughly enjoyed both National Treasure movies.  What does that say about me?  Not wise enough in general, or wise enough to draw a line?  My self-prognosis coming soon. But, yes, As Above, So Below is as dumb as movies get, and it wants its audience to take it so very seriously.  The aforementioned National Treasure movies fill similar…

Reviews

Stage Fright

By: Addison Wylie Stage Fright is a spirited stab to revive the musical genre through comedy and horror.  And thankfully, Jerome Sable’s game attempt at directing such a film satisfies his audience.  Call it a yuk-yuck sort of flick. If a filmmaker isn’t working with cartoons or with Disney, it’s a daunting task for someone to make a musical from scratch.  Musicals are – sadly – a tough sell in this day and age.  Even…

Reviews

The Scarehouse

By: Addison Wylie With every review, I try to inject some insight as to how I felt while watching the movie.  Sometimes, I use humour and metaphors to get my point across.  Writing has allowed my voice to travel along some creative routes in order to express an opinion about the medium.  There’s no feeling quite like finding a conscious flow to your thoughts. With Gavin Michael Booth’s The Scarehouse, I have nothing interesting to…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Queen of Blood

Queen of Blood (DIR. Chris Alexander) By: Addison Wylie Two years ago, Fangoria’s editor-in-chief Chris Alexander rocked the Blood in the Snow Film Festival with his filmmaking debut Blood For Irina.  He called it an “experience” and said the best way to view the film is by locking yourself in with it.  He was absolutely right.  His atmospheric silent film was a masterpiece and a sensory whirlwind; utilizing ominous music and smouldering cinematography to pull the movie goer…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Serpent’s Lullaby & Berkshire County

As movie goers prepare for the season’s holiday offerings, horror fans buckle up for a round of Canadian talent at this year’s Blood in the Snow Film Festival. The festival, founded by Kelly Michael Stewart, features the cream of the genre crop.  Blood in the Snow’s selections range from unsettling slow burns to the visually grotesque.  It’s a competently passionate showcase that gives indie filmmakers a fantastic opportunity to premiere their work, and hands audiences a rare…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Refuge

By: Addison Wylie A dangerous plague has wiped out most of humanity within wide proximity of Refuge’s main family.  The secluded family has stowed themselves away in their crumbling abode as life around them breaks down and dawns a bleak future. Refuge isn’t a film where the infected are on the hunt for the living.  Andrew Robertson’s slow burn is a study of survival as the human race turns on each other.  Unkempt gangs roam…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: ABCs of Death 2

By: Addison Wylie With recent horror anthologies, it seems as though the first instalment serves as an extreme experimental period.  There’s a foreboding feeling of failure when making a project that draws in different visions from all over a filmmaking pallet, but horror nuts who are true to their craft will let their audacious attitudes plow through anything resembling an obstacle. This was a clear example for the V/H/S series – an easy comparison to…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Wolves

By: Addison Wylie It’s funny to see Entertainment One attached to Wolves.  It almost acts as an apology to werewolf fanatics who may have been bothered by the studio’s Twilight series. Even though Wolves wipes our memories of Taylor Lautner and his chiseled abs sprinting through the woods, David Hayter’s toothy flick isn’t anything too special.  It’s a serviceable film with pop-up gems. Cayden is at that usual stage a young man hits in his…

Reviews

The Guest

By: Addison Wylie Director Adam Wingard and screenwriter Simon Barrett are two filmmakers who love the horror genre.  Furthermore, they’re filmmakers who understand the genre.  They deserve a ton of success and praise.  I hope The Guest finally gets them there. You might say, “Addison!  What’re you talking about?  These two have made a name for themselves already!”  Sure, they have; I agree that the duo have established themselves in moviemaking, but Wingard and Barrett…