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Addison Wylie

Reviews

Octavio Is Dead!

Pardon me for sounding blasé, but I can’t help but clench when a Canadian film makes supernatural suggestions.  Other than the odd exception (A Sunday Kind of Love), these are ideas that are usually squandered of their potential (Considering Love & Other Magic).  Imagine my surprise in Octavio Is Dead!, the latest filmmaking effort from Shortbus actor Sook-Yin Lee, when the writer/director treaded familiar ground but drove her film in a darker direction;  blending different…

Reviews

The Lockpicker

A teenager’s public suicide sends shockwaves through their high school, as students and teachers alike reel and cope.  On the fringe of the tragedy is Hashi, a shy creative writer who had a close friendship with the victim.  Being generally shy and uncomfortable to begin with, Hashi – despite finding an emotional connection through poetry – doesn’t know how to exhale his pain.  Unfortunately, he chooses ways to grieve that are detrimental to his life.

Reviews

The Hurricane Heist

In January, I declared Monolith as one of the dumbest movies I’d have ever seen;  despite it being an entertaining flick.  I secretly felt that no other movie released in 2018 could top its foolishness.  Little did I know Rob Cohen’s disaster movie The Hurricane Heist was waiting around the corner, ready to blow me away.

Reviews

The Accountant of Auschwitz

The Accountant of Auschwitz proposes a moral dilemma about whether to follow through convicting a 94-year-old man with crimes against humanity for contributing to the horrors of the Auschwitz death camp. The man in question, former SS guard Oskar Gröning, is physically frail, stoic, and would undoubtably live out his final years in prison, but are these current details relevant when discussing justice for 300,000 people who were murdered for their culture?

Reviews

Alex Strangelove

Craig Johnson (director/co-writer of The Skeleton Twins) returns with another sweet story about solving personal ambiguity with wonder, caution, and experience in Netflix’s Alex Strangelove.  This time, the angst takes place in high school, as Johnson evolves the “teen sex comedy” sub-genre with positive (and current) messages of sexual orientation.

Reviews

Let the Sunshine In

Movies about people looking for true love tend to be treated with a lighter attitude.  Mostly because audiences respond more efficiently to stories that they can relate to that don’t portray their problems as a wet towel.  To my recollection, Let the Sunshine In is the first film – in some time, at least – to put real weight behind this personal mission of romance.  Although the film provides relatable results for some viewers, the…

Reviews

First Reformed

In First Reformed, writer/director Paul Schrader tells a story about characters living in excruciating personal turmoil.  He then gradually develops his movie to be more visceral, so the audience can experience similar pain.  You would think keeping movie goers in a state of compelling discomfort would be a tricky balancing act for Schrader, but he succeeds with ease;  almost as if this area of emotional discomfort is a particular wheelhouse for the Taxi Driver screenwriter.