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Addison Wylie

Reviews

The Tomorrow Man

I recently interviewed Eve Harlow about her role in Noble Jones’ feature-length filmmaking debut The Tomorrow Man, a romantic drama starring John Lithgow and Blythe Danner.  Harlow and I agreed that it’s pretty lame to assume movies starring older actors are for older audiences.  However, for me, that argument starts to fold in on itself when filmmakers pander towards a specific demographic  – The Tomorrow Man does just that.

Reviews

Gloria Bell

Gloria Bell is eventually invigorating.  “Eventually” usually has a negative connotation, but not in the case of Sebastián Lelio’s movie.  After all, the search for one’s identity isn’t going to be easy.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Eve Harlow

A movie is made up of many moving parts, as you know, but The Tomorrow Man really makes you appreciate its supporting characters.  John Lithgow and Blythe Danner (as Ed and Ronnie) are terrific actors who have no problem holding our attention and steering the story (provided by writer/director Noble Jones).  But, their characters would have a hard time finding momentum if it wasn’t for Ed’s temperamental family – a group of people we’re briefly involved…

Reviews

Pavarotti

Pavarotti is a celebration of Luciano Pavarotti’s career and his achievements as a legendary opera singer and performer.  Ron Howard’s documentary is jovial, just as Pavarotti was known to be.  As someone who had limited knowledge of the timeless tenor, I walked away from Howard’s enlightening documentary with a new appreciation for music.

Reviews

Meeting Gorbachev

I don’t take umbrage with why Werner Herzog and André Singer made a documentary about former Soviet Union president Mikhail Gorbachev.  Considering how elated both filmmakers are when they’re on screen with Gorbachev, the audience can see how much interest they have in this passion project.  However, I feel that their starstruck smokescreen stunted this project from resembling a movie worth watching.

Reviews

The Poison Rose

P.I Carson Philips (John Travolta) accepts a missing persons case that returns him to his hometown.  Reminding movie goers of Walking Tall, Philips observes that his old stomping ground is unlike how he remembers it, which leads into an overlapping conspiracy involving the recent murder of a star high school quarterback.

Reviews

Aniara

If you prefer science fiction to be grim, perhaps Pella Kågerman and Hugo Lilja’s Aniara will be your “thing”.  Although I can’t comment on the film’s faithfulness to its source material (Harry Martinson’s Nobel prize winning poem of the same name), Aniara is very good in terms of riveting near-future sci-fi, but it’s definitely for a specific crowd.