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Addison Wylie

Reviews

Dim the Fluorescents

Dim the Fluorescents is a fast and furious masterclass in deadpan comedy.  Its filmmaker, Daniel Warth, knows this and doesn’t miss an opportunity to make an uncomfortably honest comment about creative communities, or portray convoluted art – no matter how ridiculous it is – as believable impassioned labours of love.

Reviews

The Dancer

Stephanie Di Giusto’s The Dancer is one of the more interesting biopics in recent memory.  It’s by the book in terms of the genre’s formula and narrative structure but Di Giusto finds another way to look at her film’s biographical material.

Reviews

Big Time

Big Time does a good job acknowledging the genius of Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, even if the documentary lacks modesty.  However, I felt distance between myself and Ingels, and director Kaspar Astrup Schröder wasn’t doing anything to mend this gap.

Reviews

Suck It Up

Audiences were recently subjected to a tasteless dark comedy about understanding death called Considering Love & Other Magic.  Thankfully, movie goers can rebound with Suck It Up, another Canadian indie about comprehending grief that actually sticks its landing thanks to fantastic performances and Jordan Canning’s thoughtful direction.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Fake Blood’

Collaborating filmmakers Rob Grant and Mike Kovac receive a tape from an alleged fan mimicking a disturbing scene from their crime comedy Mon Ami.  Rob and Grant, immediately feeling guilty about inspiring a movie goer in the wrong way, reflect on cinematic violence and compare it to real-life acts of assault.  It’s a personal insightful adventure that leads them down an unpredictable rabbit hole.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Darken’

In 2014, at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival, I had rather exciting things to say about director Audrey Cummings.  The film she screened was her feature film debut, Berkshire County, and while it treaded common ground, she at least showed enough awareness to spin clichés into something new.