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Addison Wylie

Reviews

Love Jacked

Maya (22 Jump Street’s Amber Stevens West) is left scrambling when she finds her fiancé “fooling around” with another girl.  Having met the man of her dreams while visiting Africa, she returns home with a lie that will convince her parents that she still has her life on track.  A kind stranger named Malcolm (Shamier Anderson) meets Maya during his own panic as a greedy former friend (Tyrell played by Lyriq Bent) chases him down….

Reviews

ABU

ABU is a beautiful trip through the life of Pakistani-Muslim filmmaker Arshad Khan.  It’s also an outstanding and promising feature-length debut by the filmmaker.

Reviews

Mary Goes Round

Mary Goes Round is an acceptable gateway to long-form filmmaking for Canadian writer/director Molly McGlynn.  She comes prepared with a resume of shorts, of which I’ve only seen one (3-Way (Not Calling)).  It was so illustrious with its humour and honesty, that I started to anticipate McGlynn’s first feature-length film.

Reviews

The China Hustle

As a film critic, you try to keep an open mind;  especially with subject matter that may not be of personal interest in the first place.  Those films have the opportunity to teach something new.  That said, economical documentaries are still my kryptonite – they’re still too dense to comprehend.  Jed Rothstein’s The China Hustle – a film about devious activity on Wall Street – is more proof of that, but it also surprised me.

Reviews

Maker of Monsters: The Extraordinary Life of Beau Dick

A new documentary called Maker of Monsters: The Extraordinary Life of Beau Dick was formally titled Meet Beau Dick.  The older title is fitting because, over the course of 90 minutes, that’s exactly what the audience does thoroughly.  I assume the name change was for keepsake purposes since Beau Dick passed away last year at the age of 61.  But no matter what it’s called, Maker of Monsters is a good movie.  Standardly structured, but an honourable film…

Reviews

Paradox

Netflix is a juggernaut of content, and they’re still breaking the mould.  Just take Daryl Hannah’s Paradox, for instance.  Who could’ve guessed the streaming service could turn your living room into a snooty arthouse theatre?  That’s a flippant comment but, boy, is Paradox excruciatingly smug.  How do you rate or review this movie?  Is this even a movie?