Addison Wylie

Reviews

Generation Wealth

Inspired by her catalogue of photography and her award-winning documentary The Queen of Versailles, Lauren Greenfield set off to encapsulate global obsessions of self-value in her latest doc Generation Wealth.  However, if you ask me, Generation Wealth has not only been inspired by Greenfield’s career and questions about society, but also by various unfinished stories seeking closure.

Reviews

Shock and Awe

Woody Harrelson, James Marsden, Jessica Biel, Milla Jovovich, Rob Reiner, and Tommy Lee Jones.  These actors all play key parts in Shock and Awe, a political drama Reiner directs.  Unfortunately, they’re all overqualified for this generic vehicle.

Reviews

Our House

Our House graduates from the “Paranormal Activity Institute of Small and Effectual Scares”.  Actually, if we’re rating this supernatural horror against the Paranormal Activity series, it’s on par with the first two films, and ranks higher than the franchise’s final two chapters.  For what it’s worth, that’s a decent sweet spot for Anthony Scott Burns and his feature-length debut.

Reviews

Future World

For as rambunctious as Future World is, it’s awfully dull.  This disappointing joint effort comes from directors Bruce Thierry Cheung and James Franco, although considering how successful Franco has been as a director, I wonder if he was hired to guide Cheung.  Nonetheless, both filmmakers fail at establishing this tattered reality, which falls somewhere between a hellscape and a subsisting rebirth.  The survivors also seem to be an uneven mix of copied characters from other movies.

Reviews

Filmworker

Stanley Kubrick was a peculiar anomaly.  He was a world famous filmmaker with a classic catalogue, yet he lived an elusive life.  Allegedly, it was rare to be granted access into Kubrick’s personal life, and it was more rare to find someone who would be willing to put themselves that close to him considering Kubrick’s infamous reputation.

Reviews

7 Splinters in Time

7 Splinters in Time advances from a well-timed reveal.  It’s a wordy spiel of exposition delivered by the dependable and always admirable character actor Austin Pendleton, but it’s a scene that justifies the film’s frenetic style and narrative;  turning incomprehensible details into awesome creativity.

Reviews

The King

Eugene Jarecki takes to the road in Elvis Presley’s 1963 Rolls Royce in The King.  The documentary’s narrative itself is like Jarecki’s luggage – crammed-full and seeping out of the zippers.  However, this stuffed film is interesting in ways thought-provoking open discussions can be.