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August 2017

Reviews

Death Note

Death Note is a good movie, but it would’ve made a great miniseries.  Netflix’s fast-track adaptation of Tsugumi Ôba’s popular manga series is light on characterization, with a troublesome lack of introduction by screenwriters Jeremy Slater (The Lazarus Effect), Charley Parlapanides and Vlas Parlapanides (the Parlapanides’ wrote Immortals).

Reviews

Le Ride

Le Ride is proof of the intrepid courage and exhausting circumstances that happen during long cross-country treks.  The documentary is also proof that writer/director/star Phil Keoghan can walk the walk and talk the talk.

Reviews

Dave Made a Maze

Bill Watterson’s Dave Made a Maze will receive comparisons to Dan Harmon’s TV show Community.  Their quirky in similar ways, the characters are alike, and there’s an uncanny connection to pop culture in both.  Most importantly, just like in Harmon’s cult hit, Dave Made a Maze is a story of misfits trying to define their self-worth while “adulting” by way of their own arrested development.

Reviews

Phoenix Forgotten

Derivative scares are surrounded by boring filler and exposition in Phoenix Forgotten, a feature debut by graphic artist Justin Barber that’s also been stupefyingly blessed by producer Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner, The Martian).

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ TIFF ’17 – Canadian Slate

Despite all the less-than-stellar changes made to TIFF this year, the festival continues to excel in giving a voice to Canadian filmmakers and video artists.  Representatives of TIFF, once again, gathered in the Fairmont Royal York hotel to announce Canadian films which will play at the festival this year and then – presumably – disappear into Canadian cinemas, where a few of them will compete with the latest Oscar bait and Hollywood slop.

Reviews

Menashe

Menashe acts as both a faithful slice of life of ultra-Orthodox Judaism and an effective character drama from the perspective of a widower.  The resonance is thin though, leaving the audience feeling lukewarm towards Joshua Z Weinstein’s otherwise efficient movie.