Wylie Writes

Reviews

I’m Going to Break Your Heart

By: Trevor Chartrand I’m Going to Break Your Heart is an observational documentary that explores the relationship between Canadian indie-rock legend Raine Maida and his Juno-Award winning wife Chantal Kreviazuk as they collaborate on their first album together.  The couple struggles as all couples do, with the added challenges and frustrations of working together to create art as a team.

Reviews

Drunk Parents

Fred Wolf and Peter Gaulke have a calling for slacker comedy, though their sense of humour hasn’t been well-received.  They collaborated on Happy Madison’s Strange Wilderness, and while that film is pitiful, it’s also exactly what it set out to be – a scrappy stoner comedy conceived by a crew of people who must’ve been on heavy hallucinogens during the making-of.  In that sense, it finds success as a guilty pleasure that willingly goes in some weird…

Reviews

Non-Fiction

By: Jolie Featherstone The latest film from Olivier Assayas (Personal Shopper, Clouds of Sils Maria) is a classic comedy of manners imbued with dry wit and social commentary aplenty set amongst the bourgeois-bohemian Parisian publishing world.

Reviews

Ask Dr. Ruth

Ryan White’s The Case Against 8, while very good, was a straightforward example of the documentary genre’s expectations – the film explained a controversial issue, gave a platform to those opposing it, and gave viewers an uplifting feeling about an encouraging future.  White’s latest doc Ask Dr. Ruth, while also very good, is different.  It presents facts in a way that’s much more personable.

Reviews

This Is North Preston

This Is North Preston is a spinning top.  One moment, you’ll have your mind made up about what the documentary is presenting only to have your opinion changed a few more times.  I was so gobsmacked by the end that I was almost inclined to rewatch the film to see if my opinion would change again – I dare you to find a more riveting documentary than this.

Reviews

Walking on Water

Christo and Jeanne-Claude were a married couple who were well-known for creating massive works by altering the environment around them, often by wrapping a giant structure in plastic or introducing new foreign elements into an established setting.  Their works were equally celebrated and ridiculed by the artistic elites and society at large.  When Jeanne-Claude passed away from a brain aneurysm, Christo’s attempt to honour her came as a realization of a work they had planned…

Reviews

Ordinary Days

A feature-length story being dissected into individual short films is a concept full of possibilities, only to be expanded on when three filmmakers sign up to shape the narrative.  Canadian thriller Ordinary Days take a swing at this challenge but, unfortunately, produces weak results.