Latest

Trevor Chartrand

Reviews

One Road to Quartzsite

By: Trevor Chartrand The town of Quartzsite, Arizona hosts an eclectic mix of wanderers each winter, from senior snowbirds in RVs to homeless nomads, from drug addicts to nudist bookstore owners. You’d think the locale, with its bizarre amalgamation of citizens and a variety of worldviews, would be a melting pot for an inevitable conflict.  However, as filmmaker Ryan Maxey demonstrates in his doc One Road to Quartzsite, the town is surprisingly tranquil – peaceful…

Reviews

Orah

By: Trevor Chartrand Lonzo Nzekwe tells a very personal story in his gritty revenge-thriller, Orah.  Having lost his brother at the hands of an alleged corrupt police officer in Nigeria, the filmmaker has admittedly helmed this movie as a sort-of revenge fantasy;  with his characters exacting justice in ways he never could.  As the film’s writer and director, Nzekwe’s ambitions are noble and empowering but, as a film, Orah is ultimately a messy series of…

Reviews

T.I.M.

By: Trevor Chartrand For years, filmmakers have pondered the potentially apocalyptic dangers of self-aware, sentient computers: from Kubrick to the Wachowski’s, and everything in between.  The machine uprising is an all-too-common cautionary tale, but has also never been more relevant than it is today.  With deepfakes and ChatGPT, it appears we are closer than we’ve ever been to this trope becoming a reality.  So the timing is right for director Spencer Brown to throw his…

Reviews

15 Cameras

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Danny Madden brings us 15 Cameras, the second sequel to 2015’s 13 Cameras, just in time for this year’s spooky season.  The third entry in this series is serviceable, with an interesting twist on the original premise.  It’s a creepy thriller through-and-through, despite being a tad obvious with its metaphors.

Reviews

The Beasts

By: Trevor Chartrand The Beasts, from director Rodrigo Sorogoyen, is based on the ominous and tragic true story of discrimination set in rural Galicia, Spain.  With all due respect to the victims involved, this true story is captivating – there’s tons of cinematic potential in this narrative that The Beasts, frankly, fails to exploit.  Instead of a tense, emotional thriller, Sorogoyen has chosen to take a much slower paced and melodramatic direction, which doesn’t feel…

Reviews

Jules

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Marc Turtletaub, who helmed 2018’s thought-provoking drama Puzzle, delivers warm-and-fuzzies once again with this sophomore indie, Jules.  This surprisingly entertaining film is sweet, endearing, and often laugh-out-loud funny.

Reviews

The Channel

By: Trevor Chartrand The Channel, directed and co-written by William Kaufman, is a sub-par action-thriller that lacks charisma and crowd-pleasing charm.  A typical B-Movie in almost every way, the film feels completely unoriginal and uninspired, borrowing many tropes and concepts from much more successful films.