Latest

Gravitas Ventures

Reviews

Sam & Mattie Make a Zombie Movie

In the spirit of American Movie and Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made, Sam & Mattie Make a Zombie Movie is a fun movie about the indie filmmaking process.  This time, audiences watch aspiring filmmakers Sam Suchmann and Mattie Zufelt, best friends since hitting it off at the Special Olympics as youngsters, as they attempt to cut their teeth making the most outrageous party-horror ever made.  Their dream project is titled…

Reviews

Meltdown

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Fredric Golding takes a look at climate change with Meltdown, a documentary that focuses on the decline of melting glaciers in Greenland, the world’s ‘ground zero’ for evidence of climate change.  The film features an odd-couple collaboration between Yale Science professor Tony Leiserowitz and renowned photographer Lynn Davis – two vastly different personalities with a shared interest in raising Global Warming awareness.

Reviews

First Blush

Written and directed by Victor Neumark, First Blush is the story of a young married couple, Nena (Rachel Alig) and Drew (Ryan Caraway), who decide to open up their relationship after they meet a beautiful young actress named Olivia (Kate Beecroft).  For a feature film debut, First Blush is passable and hints at Neumark’s talent for exploring complex interpersonal dynamics.  However, as a depiction of polyamory, it misses the mark.

Reviews

Baby Done

As much as I’m glad pro-choice movies are becoming more frequent in the mainstream eye, it’s refreshing to watch a movie about a couple who are thrilled to be expecting a baby. That nice feeling washed over me while watching Curtis Vowell’s humble comedy Baby Done, which plays as a millennial’s version of This Is 40 that’s just as funny with as many rough edges.

Reviews

Grizzly II: Revenge

The best thing about Grizzly II: Revenge is how its hilarious marketing completely blindsides the audience.  The lost 80s sequel to 1976’s thriller Grizzly has been promoted as a vicious horror starring a young George Clooney, Laura Dern, and Charlie Sheen.  Those Oscar winners, and Charlie Sheen, certainly show up within the first few minutes to only be mauled by a man-eating grizzly bear by the following scene. 

Reviews

Elyse

Written and directed by Stella Hopkins, Elyse is an uninventive and poorly-written depiction of mental illness.  To watch Anthony Hopkins, Stella Hopkins’ husband and arguably one of the greatest actors of our time, perform in a film this tedious and inexpert is a truly baffling experience.  Mental illness is a complex and nuanced theme, but Elyse’s exploration of a wealthy but unsatisfied white woman’s inner world is obvious and riddled with clichés.

Reviews

The Orange Years: The Nickelodeon Story

I’m laying my cards out on the table: I have an unconditional love for Nickelodeon.  The network defined my childhood, helped diversify my media and sense of humour, and it was an outlet for truly unique entertainment.  As much as I tried to enter Scott Barber and Adam Sweeney’s documentary The Orange Years: The Nickelodeon Story without an enamouring bias, it was impossible.

Reviews

My Dad’s Christmas Date

Recently, I reviewed the hilariously spot-on holly-jolly spoof Cup of Cheer.  The comedy did such a good job calling out tropes, clichés, and lazy writing found in Christmas movies.  What it didn’t do, and what I realized after watching My Dad’s Christmas Date, is that Cup of Cheer didn’t poke fun at deceptive movies that bait viewers with seasonal qualities to dress up an otherwise dismal story.  If My Dad’s Christmas Date didn’t occasionally show…

Reviews

Defying All Odds

By: Trevor Chartrand Defying All Odds is an inspirational documentary that takes a hopeful, optimistic look the possibilities of contemporary medical studies and research.  In the climate of the pandemic we’re currently faced with, a positive outlook is a much needed breath of fresh air.

Reviews

DTF

What begins as an attempt to record a widowed, middle-aged pilot’s efforts to find true love on the dating app Tinder quickly morphs into something much darker and chaotic in director Al Bailey’s documentary DTF.  As the pilot in question, an old friend of Bailey’s identified only by the pseudonym “Christian”, reveals increasingly outlandish and destructive behavior, the original premise of the film is abandoned in favour of an exploration of the toxic, hard-partying world…