A71

Reviews

There Are No Fakes

Kevin Hearn, keyboardist for The Barenaked Ladies and an avid art collector, accidentally opened a can of worms by purchasing a painting by late indigenous artist Norval Morrisseau.  During an exhibit of Hearn’s curated pieces at the Art Gallery of Ontario, his Morrisseau was proven to be bogus.  This pivotal event (which also led to a lengthy court case) pulled a thread, unravelling conflicting opinions surrounding a remarkable mystery behind Morrisseau’s work.

Reviews

Hellmington

Hellmington centres on Detective Samantha Woodhouse, distressed over the recent death of her father and tormented by a forgotten yet mysterious case of the disappearance of a former high school classmate.  In order to piece together the puzzle of the latter, Samantha reconnects with her past while she’s in town for the funeral;  including meeting old acquaintances and people who were close to her late dad.

Reviews

Acquainted

Acquainted is the type of indie that wants to say something profound about romance.  Little does writer/director Natty Zavitz know, dozens of other movies have beat him to the punch.

Reviews

An Audience of Chairs

An Audience of Chairs isn’t just one movie.  This new film from Deanne Foley (Relative Happiness) based on Joan Clark’s novel of the same name appears to be a sombre Canadian drama that you prepare for by stuffing your pockets full of tissue.  While it is a tear-jerker, it’s also a character drama, a romance, and a message film.  And, surprisingly enough, Foley pulls off this trifecta.

Reviews

Across the Line

At first glance, Across the Line is a common film that exposes a type of impressionable racial discrimination filmmakers have acknowledged before.  This time, the devastation hits close to home (Nova Scotia) and allows a breakout director to handle the heavy material in a different way that doesn’t dance around the aftermath.

One-on-Ones

People Hold On (plus a One-On-One with Director Michael Seater)

By: Addison Wylie Life With Derek’s Michael Seater gets his directorial feet wet with the ensemble dramedy People Hold On.  It’s a good place for the budding filmmaker to start.  The film itself is contained within few environments and doesn’t call for visual tricks, which leaves Seater a lot of time to draw characters and connect with his tight-knit cast.  The filmmaker must’ve also felt another level of comfort and confidence knowing co-star Paula Brancati – whom…