Love

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ The 2016 ReelAbilities Film Festival

Movie goers fresh off of Hot Docs may want to consider moseying over to Toronto’s first annual ReelAbilities Film Festival.  The 6ix will be joining the ranks of other worldwide communities like New York, Portland, and Chicago to showcase filmmakers who are adamant in portraying people with different abilities and their inspiring stories.

Reviews

The Lobster

One of the most exciting voices of contemporary cinema has hit that point in his career where he needs to make his first English language feature.  Thankfully, unlike countless others before him, Yorgos Lanthimos managed to avoid the usual pitfalls of the “first English feature” and results in The Lobster, a film as weird and brilliant as his previous features Dogtooth and ALPS.

Reviews

Meet the Patels

By: Shannon Page Sibling filmmakers Ravi and Geeta Patel’s Meet the Patels is a feel-good documentary/romantic comedy hybrid that achieves everything that it sets out to do.  The film, which began as a home video of a trip that the Patel family took to India, follows Ravi’s journey to find the woman of his dreams while navigating the expectations of his Indian-American family as well as his own connection to his cultural and heritage.  It…

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2015: ‘Love’

By: Mark Barber Love is about reconciling romance with sex;  something its director, French provocateur Gaspar Noé, and the film’s main protagonist, Murphy (Karl Glusman), agree on.  Whether or not Noé is successful in marrying romance and sex (and whether they are even really that diametrically opposed outside of some conceptions of pornography) doesn’t matter.  Love faults in so many other ways, it’s easy to ignore its ambition. Love tells the story of the turbulent…

Reviews

My Ex-Ex

By: Addison Wylie American gross-out comedies were so popular during the birth of the 2000s, Canadian cinema hopped on board.  I vividly remember Mark Griffiths’ road trip flick Going the Distance and Dave Thomas’ workplace scrub clad comedy Intern Academy being released in 2004, and producing piddly groans. Canadian filmmakers are hitting another “monkey see, monkey do” phase as movie goers flock towards the comedic chops of Judd Apatow and his filmmaking protégés.  Just like…

Reviews

Love Is Strange

By: Addison Wylie There’s an aristocratic quality to Love Is Strange.  Everyone is nicely dressed in houses and restaurants that could all be rated five-stars.  Characters laugh at high-brow jokes and mild-mannerly talk about “the classics”.  Love Is Strange is a film so tidy, that you kind of want to scowl at it.  But, the film is far too sweet and performed with accomplishment to feel such resentment towards Ira Sachs’ film. Ben and George…

Reviews

Making the Rules

By: Addison Wylie Mustering through Making the Rules is like watching a bunch of people try and sail using only the framework of a boat. The film marks the acting debut of musician Robin Thicke.  This triggers a question right off the bat: is watching thespian Thicke as painful as it sounds?  My answer may disappoint those wanting me to slam the Blurred Lines hit maker.  I honestly couldn’t tell you if his performance is…

CrowdFUNding

CrowdFUNding: James Evans’ DIY Shakespeare

  By: Addison Wylie I’ve always seen a bright future for actor James Evans.  James and I attended the same high school and we were fortunate to take part in a few stage productions together.  He’s  a really sharp and talented guy who – to my memory – does a spot-on Don Knotts. Where James and I differ is with Shakespeare.  I’ve always had a difficult time grasping onto William Shakespeare’s writing.  Evans not only…

Reviews

Her

By: Addison Wylie “Bittersweet” is the best word to describe Her.  Spike Jonze has taken our bad habits with technology and projected them to frame an original love story with messages of poignancy.  It’s a personal film about an impersonal society. The characters on-screen are closed off to everyone around them.  Among them is writer Theodore Twombly (played by Joaquin Phoenix who is a spitting image of Napoleon Dynamite’s “womanizing” brother Kip).  People are enjoyably…

Reviews

Blue Is the Warmest Colour

By: Addison Wylie Palme d’Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Colour is an intellectual work about observing and defining sexuality.  It’s a raw look allowing the viewer to be in clear view of everything, but by no means presents itself as indecent. In fact, those graphic scenes of sexual content that seem to be flooding the media surrounding Blue Is the Warmest Colour with controversy are represented this way because there is no other way…