Judd Apatow

Reviews

The Big Sick

Kumail Nanjiani (played by funnyman Kumail Nanjiani) is a Pakistani-American comedian who meets and falls in love with Emily (Zoe Kazan), a graduate student.  Their relationship is already threatened by Kumail’s parents’ insistence that he marry a woman from a Pakistani family, when Emily becomes seriously ill.  Written by Nanjiani (usually known for his co-star work in Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, Life as we Know It, and IFC’s Portlandia) and the actor’s wife Emily V. Gordon, The…

Reviews

Trainwreck

By: Addison Wylie Trainwreck is much more than a vehicle for rising comedic star Amy Schumer.  It’s easily Judd Apatow’s strongest work as a filmmaker, evidence that Schumer’s honesty flows through her long form screenwriting, and the best romantic comedy this critic has seen since 2008’s criminally underrated Definitely, Maybe. Definitely, Maybe is a standard sort of rom-com, where Trainwreck sends home the same type of charm but also reflects contemporary pessimism towards romance.  It…

Reviews

Neighbors

By: Addison Wylie Neighbors has more than a handful of really good laughs.  It’s also consistently likeable and plays with its R-rating in a way that doesn’t feel too childish. Mac and Kelly (played by Seth Rogan and Rose Byrne) are concerned about losing touch with their more spontaneous sides after they move into a new neighbourhood.  They don’t hate their adult life though.  They get a kick out of their baby daughter – the…

Reviews

This Is 40

By: Addison Wylie I would love to see what writer/director Judd Apatow could do with a film that punches out after 90 minutes – including credits. This Is 40 starts out strong and funny, but is then torpedoed by needless subplots that are tediously stretched out causing the runtime to slowly expand. Apatow has shown with his previous directorial work that he loves to let his material breathe. Not in a pretentious way, but in…

Reviews

The Five-Year Engagement

By: Addison Wylie There are many scenes in The Five-Year Engagement where it’ll be hard for movie goers to separate themselves from the movie without being reminded of being in similar situations. For instance, a quick scene where Tom Solomon (played by Jason Segel) is having a disagreement with his friend Alex (played by Chriss Pratt) about flirting vs. being friendly especially rang true because I’ve been on Tom’s side before when talking to my…