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Indigenous

Reviews

There Are No Fakes

Kevin Hearn, keyboardist for The Barenaked Ladies and an avid art collector, accidentally opened a can of worms by purchasing a painting by late indigenous artist Norval Morrisseau.  During an exhibit of Hearn’s curated pieces at the Art Gallery of Ontario, his Morrisseau was proven to be bogus.  This pivotal event (which also led to a lengthy court case) pulled a thread, unravelling conflicting opinions surrounding a remarkable mystery behind Morrisseau’s work.

Reviews

The Grizzlies

By: Trevor Chartrand You’ll be hard pressed to find a more Canadian film than The Grizzlies;  the inspiring true story of an impoverished Nunavut community battling mental illness by creating a sports team.  Over ten years in the making, this long-time passion project of director Miranda de Pencier is a not only a well-made dramatic film, but also a small taste of the type of media representation First Nations and Inuit citizens deserve.

Reviews

Indian Horse

Indian Horse is ingrained with prejudice experienced by Canada’s Indigenous people.  Director Stephen S. Campanelli, who is usually hired as a camera operator on mainstream films, gives his audience a firsthand perspective of this chilling history while adapting Richard Wagamese’s award-winning novel of the same name.

Reviews

Fractured Land

Eco-friendly independent documentaries are sometimes a hard sell to the general moviegoing public.  Unless you have pre-invested interest in the subject matter (in this case, fracking) or the film’s guiding hand (in this case, indigenous activist Caleb Behn), these movies can come across as droning strolls through textbooks of material.  It’s a shame since so many of these films are thoughtful and important.