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Ravers

In Ravers, a bad batch of energy drinks are cracked into during a night-long party at an abandoned factory.  Once consumed, the partiers begin twitching, “bugging out”, and eventually  become violently belligerent with superhuman strength.  Given that everyone is already shoulder-to-shoulder, with some who are already high on street drugs to begin with, the danger escalates quickly as our main heroes (including Becky, a germaphobic journalist) fight for survival.

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His House

His House not only offers a new take on haunted horrors, but it offers a weaved interpretation of grief and guilt that’s both innovative and effectual.  It’s essentially the ideal horror movie for audiences looking for scares and substance.

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Come Play

Come Play feels like a natural throwback to traditional horror, where filmmakers build creative lore for a creature new to the genre. In this case, the monster is “Larry”: large, scaly, and looking for a companion. Larry zeroes in on Oliver (Azhy Robertson), a non-verbal outsider with Autism who struggles to make friends at school. We don’t know how long Larry has been observing Oliver for, but it must’ve been enough time for the creature…

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Mass Hysteria

Don’t count out Mass Hysteria as just another holiday comedy.  What appears to be a silly, seasonal National Lampoon-copycat at first turns out to be a pretty funny and original horror-comedy worthy of an annual watch around Halloween.

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To Your Last Death

By: Jolie Featherstone To Your Last Death is a high-tension trip in the line of recent genre-blending thrillers where a young woman cuts a swath through an army of those who would do her harm in a journey of survival and vindication.  Think Ready or Not meets the Preacher graphic novel series, To Your Last Death throws a pacifistic activist into an ultimate death match where she must resort to a kill-or-be-killed mindset to survive.

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The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw

Fresh for October’s spooky movie season, Thomas Robert Lee’s The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw is an eerie period-piece horror film about a witch and her daughter’s unnerving control over the fate and sanity of a nearby rural village.  Effectively atmospheric and compellingly acted, The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw seems to strive to ride the coattails of Robert Egger’s magnum opus The Witch, though it evidently falls short of that mark.

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Possessor Uncut

Possessor Uncut is a surprisingly undercooked psychological horror from Brandon Cronenberg.  It’s filled with provocative qualities, but they’ve been assembled in a way that doesn’t come together and, instead, work as standalone strengths.

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The Last Laugh

For a movie about comedians, writer/director Jeremy Berg’s The Last Laugh is utterly void of mirth.  Unfortunately, this isn’t just a film that takes itself far too seriously – it lacks vibrancy and life all together.

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Ravage

Ravage is essentially a campfire story for mature audiences: there’s a lot of build up, an unsettling suggestion of what could happen, and then a freaky follow through.  What we learn throughout the film, however, is that writer/director Teddy Grennan and the film’s nincompoop producers are incapable of closing their set-ups.  This is demonstrated by some earlier mini murders, making us apprehensive about its grand finale when a ludicrous torture chamber is invented and utterly…

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Uncle Peckerhead

The first hurdle of any music-centric film is often the most difficult to clear: the music itself.  It’s difficult to get the audience to root for the heroes if their band’s sound is cringe-inducing.  Or, even worse, if it’s just plain boring.