Horror

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘Prospect’ and ‘The Ranger’

Prospect (DIR. Chris Caldwell, Zeek Earl) First, we lived through “mumblecore”.  Then, we were subjected to “mumblegore”.  Now, it seems like the next logical step is to “mumblego” where no man has gone before.  Case in point: Chris Caldwell and Zeek Earl’s exercise in furious navel-gazing, Prospect, a film so enamored by its own cleverness that it manages to make its modest runtime seem endless.  A film whose total lack of direction in favour of world-building…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘I’ll Take Your Dead’ and ‘Mega Time Squad’

I’ll Take Your Dead (DIR. Chad Archibald) The multi-hyphen horror film is just a concept that is here to stay.  Despite everything being a hyphenated genre lately, very few films actually know how to do it well.  The issue is that these films are often so lost in their own muddled genres, that they forget to specialize in one.  Very rarely can someone pull off an actually balanced hyphenated genre film, leading to practical magic when…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘The Inhabitant’ and ‘Tigers Are Not Afraid’

The Inhabitant (DIR. Guillermo Amoedo) Latin American cinema is in the middle of a great resurgence, creating some of the best works since the cinemas of poverty of the 1960s.  On another hand, there has been an influx of supernatural home invasion films: thieves having to deal with demons who won’t let them leave, a torrent which deemed any new arrivals in the genre mundane.  Using this dichotomy, one is left to wonder what the…

Reviews

Strange Nature

Some will compare Strange Nature to Eli Roth’s Cabin Fever based on a glance at the film’s premise about a deadly outbreak.  Others, including myself, will find the flick to be a fitting throwback to a brand of vintage cinema that gave audiences thrills and chills yet remained ambiguous about its genre.  Is it a horror?  A thriller?  And, does the plot act as a parable for a real-life disaster?  In the same way Godzilla…

Reviews

3: An Eye for an Eye

By: Graeme Howard Lou Simon’s 3: An Eye for an Eye is a revenge thriller with a healthy amount of twists to subvert viewer expectations.  Unfortunately, the stiff and unconvincing performances lead to an experience that will be predictable, drab, and confusing for most.

Reviews

Our House

Our House graduates from the “Paranormal Activity Institute of Small and Effectual Scares”.  Actually, if we’re rating this supernatural horror against the Paranormal Activity series, it’s on par with the first two films, and ranks higher than the franchise’s final two chapters.  For what it’s worth, that’s a decent sweet spot for Anthony Scott Burns and his feature-length debut.

Reviews

Hereditary

By: Nick van Dinther It’s so difficult to pull off a horror film that’s truly frightening.  Many movies rely on jump scares or violent deaths, but the results rarely stick with you after the fact.  It’s a genre that’s incredibly divisive between both fans and critics, and fails more often than it succeeds for both.  A filmmaker needs to bring something genuinely special and memorable to the table to appeal to all.  Writer/director Ari Aster…

Reviews

Another Soul

Another Soul will remind viewers of other movies.  It’s an echo of supernatural horror stories told before featuring demons, possessions, conflicted parents, and exorcisms.  But, Another Soul is also a shoestring effort working with limited resources that no one would truly want to slam because the cast and crew are simply “doing their best”.  This, perhaps, could’ve acted as an excuse to criticize Paul Chau’s film on a curve, but I’m afraid the Paranormal Activity franchise has…