French

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Hitchcock/Truffaut: Magnificent Obsessions

Contemporary cinephilia places – at times – undue emphasis on the auteur in relation to their work and in relation to the works of others.  Intertwined authorship and intertextuality are the two most recurrent approaches in film criticism.  As such, it’s easy to rationalize the existence of the Hitchcock/Truffaut: Magnificent Obsessions retrospective at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, given the sheer amount of discourse written on the famous relationship of Alfred Hitchcock and François Truffaut.

Festival Coverage

Inside Out 2016: ‘Paris 05:59: Theo & Hugo’

Unsimulated sex and its utilization in film is a continuing debate between movie aficionados on whether the uncensored acts add to a story or the general moviegoing experience.  French filmmakers Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau create a controversial – yet very convincing – argument towards the issue in their minimalist drama Paris 05:59: Theo & Hugo.

Reviews

Serial (Bad) Weddings

By: Addison Wylie Serial (Bad) Weddings is a funny flick before it gets cold feet. Christian Clavier is the deadpan Claude Verneuil, a father who is constantly faced with cultural differences.  Three daughters all marry over the course of three years, and all fall in love with men of different cultural backgrounds.  The Verneuil’s welcome Chinese, Muslim, and Jewish ethnicities.  The men are all standoffish with each other, the women are defensive, and the parents…

Reviews

The Grand Budapest Hotel

By: Addison Wylie Audiences can witness Wes Anderson going through filmmaking periods.  We’re not exactly sure what’s triggering these changes of pace, but those willing to follow the whimsical auteur don’t regret the trip. As of late, Anderson has been wearing his French influences on his sleeve – or, rather across his forehead.  He made the transition with The Fantastic Mr. Fox and then went full-tilt Français with his highly acclaimed Moonrise Kingdom; nodding towards…

Reviews

Blue Is the Warmest Colour

By: Addison Wylie Palme d’Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Colour is an intellectual work about observing and defining sexuality.  It’s a raw look allowing the viewer to be in clear view of everything, but by no means presents itself as indecent. In fact, those graphic scenes of sexual content that seem to be flooding the media surrounding Blue Is the Warmest Colour with controversy are represented this way because there is no other way…

Reviews

The Intouchables

By: Addison Wylie The story behind The Intouchables is touching but it’s not earth shattering. It was a moving event in the lives of down-and-out Driss (played by Omar Sy in a fantastic debut) and for the classy, wheelchair-bound Philippe (played with equal greatness by François Cluzet) but it hasn’t had any impact on society nor are these two opposites household names because of the outcome their relationship has had. But, that doesn’t mean this…