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Found Footage

Reviews

The Road Movie

Starting this month, Dmitrii Kalashnikov’s experimental doc The Road Movie begins a theatrical tour that will last over a year.  Toronto’s Royal Cinema is the first stop, and the journey continues through the United States before heading back to Canada next February;  it concludes in Boulder, Colorado the following month.  That’s impressive for a shoestring indie, especially one that would be “TOO HOT FOR TV”.  Twenty years ago, Joe Francis would’ve sold this at 2:00am…

Reviews

Phoenix Forgotten

Derivative scares are surrounded by boring filler and exposition in Phoenix Forgotten, a feature debut by graphic artist Justin Barber that’s also been stupefyingly blessed by producer Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner, The Martian).

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto International Spring of Horror and Fantasy Film Festival ’17

The Toronto International Spring of Horror and Fantasy Film Festival is a weekend dedicated to genre appreciation conceived by filmmakers Lari Teräs and Jon Lewis.  The festival returns to the city’s indie hot spot Carlton Cinema on Friday, April 7 and carries through to Sunday, April 9, promising movie goers an eclectic three-day event filled with music videos, short films, and unique movies that are out-of-this-world.

Reviews

UFO: It Is Here

The Blair Witch Project inspired independent filmmakers and the found footage genre – the resourceful film perfectly executed psychological horror.  Blair Witch, the semi-sequel-reboot released this year, delved into the franchise’s psychological lore, but also fancied being somewhat of a creature feature with broader scares.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2016: ‘Capture Kill Release’

Capture Kill Release begins in the middle of a devious plot: young lovers Jenn and Farhang (played by Jennifer Fraser and Farhang Ghajar) are toying with the idea of murdering a random person.  Their intentions and motives are deliberately foggy, which makes the film’s fly-on-the-wall experience more unsettling, disturbing, and impossible to look away – this is not for the faint of heart.

Reviews

The Before Time

Sometimes, a film may fail at one or two or even five things.  A much rarer find is a film that manages to fail at absolutely everything it attempts.  The term “attempt” is important, since The Before Time did unintentionally succeed at making me laugh out loud several times – a much higher success rate than many recent comedies.

Reviews

JeruZalem

Most of what Yoav and Doron Paz offer movie goers in their horror film JeruZalem feels re-gifted.  We’ve seen this sort of panicked science fiction in films before – from tent-pole thrillers like Cloverfield to foreign imports like [REC].  While that may sound like the “jaded critic” side transforming me as one of the film’s demons would, I feel like I have a legitimate argument.

Reviews

Always Watching: A Marble Hornets Story

By: Addison Wylie There’s nothing new in Always Watching: A Marble Hornets Story that you haven’t already seen in other found footage horrors.  See if you can keep score at home: a small news crew ([REC]) are stringing together interviews and B-roll for a project (The Blair Witch Project), when suddenly a box of abandoned videocassette tapes containing disturbingly transfixing footage is discovered (name that Paranormal Activity sequel). A looming creature – evoking infamous Internet legends…

Reviews

Unfriended

By: Addison Wylie It’s often said that art reflects life.  Unfriended turns the mirror towards a modern age of teenagers who sometimes veer on being brain dead, yet can problem solve with the drop of a hat when they need to use technology.  Twenty years ago, a movie would only call on one token techie.  Now, a movie can afford to fill its roster with this type of character. While Unfriended deals with terrors that…

Reviews

The Lazarus Effect

By: Mark Barber David Gelb’s The Lazarus Effect offers an intriguing concept, but gets bogged down by convention. Despite its compelling concept, the premise is familiar: a group of researchers led by Frank (Mark Duplass) and his fiancée Zoe (Olivia Wilde) create the “Lazarus” serum, a formula that brings the recently deceased back to life.  This God-like power to cheat death causes things to go awry very quickly.  Zoe is killed in a laboratory accident…