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Drama

Reviews

Green Book

There is a certain sort of film that defies classification.  The quick description is the sort of film that is not perfect by any stretch of the term, but which contains just a little something that manages to hit on a collective pathos in the audience.  Those films release a positive feeling into the audience that can actually be felt when one is in such an environment.  Green Book is just such a film: it…

Reviews

Beautiful Boy

By: Jessica Goddard From director Felix Van Groeningen (The Broken Circle Breakdown), Beautiful Boy is an affecting, thought-provoking account of one family’s experience with the cyclical realities of addiction, recovery, and relapse.  The story is told sensitively – though sometimes confusingly – through a fragmented, flashback-heavy narrative structure.

Reviews

The Old Man & the Gun

By: Trevor Chartrand Part romance, part crime-drama, The Old Man & the Gun is the gripping, yet low-key, story of notorious bank robber Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford).  Based on the true story of a life-long criminal and prison escape artist, the film examines Tucker as a unique breed of villain.  Always calm and in control – but not in the suave, Ocean’s 11 type of way.  When Tucker robs a bank, he’s simply courteous, polite,…

Reviews

Lizzie

Lizzie is a decent psychological slow burn, but its problematic pacing leaves me wondering if the film could’ve been stronger had it been workshopped more.  With his second feature film, director Craig William Macneill demonstrates his ability to build tension through taut silences and piercing instrumentals.  However, Bryce Kass’ script doesn’t match the filmmaker’s patience.

Reviews

A Simple Favor

By: Jessica Goddard A movie unafraid to leave your head spinning from the farfetched quantity of twists, A Simple Favor is fun, well-paced, and stylish.  Directed by Paul Feig, it balances elements of a mystery/thriller/dramedy, borrowing from too-many-to-count eerie pop culture phenomena before it.  And yet, successfully, it pulls off homage (as opposed to shameless rip-off) time and time again, in a way that feels fresh and full of energy.

Reviews

Papillon

As someone who – sheepishly – isn’t qualified to compare this remake to its original source material (the 1973 classic starring Steve McQueen and the books written by Henri Charrière), I can tell you that as a standalone prison drama, Papillon works very well.