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Drama

Reviews

Cave Rescue

Following in the same footsteps as Clint Eastwood’s maligned biopic The 15:17 to Paris, Tom Waller’s Cave Rescue is a dramatic thriller about the 2018 real-life mission to save a team of young Thai soccer players.  Like Eastwood’s movie, it stars some of the actual people who were key players in the recovery.  There isn’t much build up to the incident in Cave Rescue, which separates it from The 15:17 to Paris.  Waller’s movie is…

Reviews

To Live To Sing

By: Jolie Featherstone Johnny Ma’s latest feature film,  To Live To Sing, is an ethereal love letter to traditional Sichuan opera troupes and to the indefatigable drive of artists protecting their vision, legacy, and family.

Reviews

Hope Gap

One thing that can be said in Hope Gap’s favour is that it has a strong sense of place.  Filmed in Seaford, Sussex, the stunning white cliffs, quaint village streets, and the dark stone beaches are displayed wonderfully.  Hope Gap is, at points, a visually beautiful film;  unfortunately, it isn’t a particularly interesting one.

Reviews

Run This Town

Run This Town, writer/director Ricky Tollman’s exceptional and intelligent feature-length debut, isn’t just about Rob Ford and and his public busts.  It’s not just about Ford’s team of “special assistants”, or the eager journalists who want a big break and be the first to report breaking news.  Run This Town is a magnetically contemplative film about the ethical decisions within these careers that jeopardize the integrity of these people.

Reviews

Ordinary Love

Ordinary Love is a superb drama with slight notes of ice-breaking wit.  It’s orchestrated along the same lines as 2017 Oscar nominee The Big Sick or last year’s Netflix sleeper Paddleton (both of which, funnily enough, co-star Ray Romano but I digress), only the premise of a middle-aged married couple coming to terms with an alarming cancer diagnosis is played, as expected, a bit more sullen.

Reviews

Standing Up, Falling Down

Standing Up, Falling Down is a really nice dramedy about people finding and relating to each other.  It’s funny, touching, performed well, and directed with fluency by newcomer Matt Ratner.  As far as movies go about characters leaning on comedy as a crutch to hide their true emotions, the film is the best of its kind since Judd Apatow’s Funny People.

Reviews

Ford v Ferrari

By: Trevor Chartrand It doesn’t take a car enthusiast to enjoy the high-octane drama that fuels Ford v Ferrari, one of the best movies of 2019.  Director James Mangold (Walk the Line, Logan) helms this fast paced, in-your-face film that’s based on the true story of the ‘car wars’ that took place in the late 1960s.  The film comes fully loaded with a classic look, (mostly) strong characters, and a tight, focused story.  Ford v Ferrari…

Reviews

Space & Time

There seems to be an unhealthy trend of shooting and wrapping film productions within a short time frame (A Fall from Grace, Appiness).  But for Toronto indie Space & Time, writer/director Shawn Gerrard sees the appeal of a patient process.  Space & Time has been shot over the period of 11 months;  allowing the film to naturally capture the passage of, well, space and time.  This lends a potentially special quality to the film’s story…

Reviews

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Céline Sciamma’s highly acclaimed drama Portrait of a Lady on Fire is visceral filmmaking at its most eloquent.  So much of this period piece hinges on textures, sights, and sounds to make the audience believe that we’re living through someone’s romantic memories.