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Drama

Reviews

Paradise

Paradise, a Holocaust drama from Russian filmmaker Andrey Konchalovsky, is surprisingly mannered considering the film’s potential.  The movie murmurs its story while over-rehearsed interviews with individual characters interject break up the pacing with intimate perspectives.

Reviews

Mudbound

By: Trevor Chartrand Showcasing the contrast between two farming families in Mississippi, Mudbound examines the overbearing racist climate of the southern states in the 1940s.  Based on a novel of the same name and directed/co-written by Dee Rees, the film takes place both during and after the Second World War.  When a white family takes ownership of a Mississippi farm, they find themselves living in the fields among the black farmhands who will work for them….

Reviews

Loving Vincent

Loving Vincent wants you to focus hard on the six-year process it took to make this movie.  This oil-painted film is the first of its kind, with over 100 artists (including Canadian Valerie Fulford) painstakingly painting over 65,000 frames to make a cohesive cinematic work of art.  Each frame is in the signature swirly style of tortured painter Vincent van Gogh.

Reviews

Lucky

The most interesting thing about Lucky is the director’s connection to the concept.  This is the directorial debut of John Carroll Lynch, a character actor who sometimes has the capability to steal a whole movie with his few scenes.  Even if you can’t recall Lynch from his name, the moment you see him appear in films (like Shutter Island and Zodiac), you can’t help but be excited to see what he does with his supporting…

Reviews

Rebel in the Rye

By: Jessica Goddard The writing instructor continuously trying to put down his most gifted student in hopes of making him better and stronger.  A father who doesn’t want to indulge his son’s delusions of a career as a professional writer.  The sight of a Capital A “artist” bent over his typewriter in an otherwise empty, white room.  These are just a few of the many contrivances the viewer of Rebel in the Rye is subjected…

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Our Souls at Night

Our Souls at Night is what I would call an “easy recommendation”.  It has a satisfying modesty that makes the viewer feel nice.  It’s also a safe suggestion for fellow movie goers within the same social circles.  However, it isn’t a “necessary recommendation” because that would require the film to carry more weight than expected while also pleasing the audience.

Reviews

Beach Rats

Beach Rats is a good coming-of-age movie from a gay perspective, but its middle portions are the most compelling.  It’s bookended by familiar emotions and the finish line is the type of gut-wrenching finale audiences expect from a sombre story like this one, but writer/director Eliza Hittman takes an interesting route to get there.

Reviews

The Neighborhood

At the moment, there isn’t a more indulgent director than Frank D’Angelo.  The Canadian entrapreneur/musician has made a film career out of mob movies featuring (and recycling) loaded casts, essentially, playing cops n’ robbers.  The material is more than criminals and anti-heroes pointing guns and using twelve-letter words to berate each other, but some have argued otherwise.  The Neighborhood, unfortunately, gives the haters ammunition.