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Drama

Reviews

Bright

Suicide Squad director David Ayer reunites with Will Smith to bring at-home audiences Bright, a Netflix Original action movie that blends “cop drama” and “buddy comedy” but exists in a fantasy amongst the mystical company of fairies and orcs.

Reviews

The Other Side of Hope

Directed, written, and produced by Finnish filmmaker Aki Kaurismäki (Le Havre, The Man Without a Past), The Other Side of Hope is a timely and oddly touching comedic drama that manages to combine artistry and humour with wry social commentary.

Reviews

Wonder Wheel

By: Jessica Goddard Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel is colourful, melodramatic, deliciously tacky cinematic theatre driven by an intriguing premise and infused with refreshing nostalgia.  It’s visually delightful, and the quirky setting and quirkier characters sustain curiosity even if those characters don’t feel totally real.

Reviews

The Dancer

Stephanie Di Giusto’s The Dancer is one of the more interesting biopics in recent memory.  It’s by the book in terms of the genre’s formula and narrative structure but Di Giusto finds another way to look at her film’s biographical material.

Reviews

Last Flag Flying

By: Jessica Goddard Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying is a touching, exquisitely-performed road trip drama, full of insight and engaging questions for the modern era.  This is a movie that never stops breaking your heart, while it keeps you guessing at all the right moments.  It’s both patriotic and skeptical;  somehow inspiring and disillusioning.

Reviews

Considering Love & Other Magic

I didn’t believe anything in Considering Love & Other Magic.  These characters are so disengaged, you could set them on fire and all they would do is shrug.  They’re all too busy pondering about death;  mostly the long-term existentialism that lingers when a loved one passes away.  The press release describes Dave Schultz’s film as a “family movie”.  Try explaining that pitch to your kids.  You’ll owe them ice cream after the show.

Reviews

Paradise

Paradise, a Holocaust drama from Russian filmmaker Andrey Konchalovsky, is surprisingly mannered considering the film’s potential.  The movie murmurs its story while over-rehearsed interviews with individual characters interject break up the pacing with intimate perspectives.

Reviews

Mudbound

By: Trevor Chartrand Showcasing the contrast between two farming families in Mississippi, Mudbound examines the overbearing racist climate of the southern states in the 1940s.  Based on a novel of the same name and directed/co-written by Dee Rees, the film takes place both during and after the Second World War.  When a white family takes ownership of a Mississippi farm, they find themselves living in the fields among the black farmhands who will work for them….