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Articles by Wylie Writes Staff

Festival Coverage

Hot Docs 2017: ‘My Enemy, My Brother’ and ‘PACmen’

My Enemy, My Brother (DIR. Ann Shin) In 2015, Ann Shin documented a rather unusual event: an Iranian child soldier, Zahed, had recently had a chance encounter with an Iraqi soldier, Najah, whom he had saved during the Iran-Iraq war, at a Vancouver institution for survivors of torture.  This chance encounter had made the two men friends.  This anomaly had led to the short film My Enemy, My Brother.  Now, Hot Docs is home to the…

Reviews

Gifted

By: Jessica Goddard Gifted is contrived, tired, and – frankly – just plain boring.  This story shamelessly and lazily recycles almost every component of its plot to the point where you’re left wondering why you’re not the one making millions writing such basic, formulaic scripts.

Reviews

Song to Song

By: Nick Ferwerda Song to Song is tough to summarize.  Then again, I expect nothing less from Terrence Malick.  The Oscar-nominated filmmaker is known to make, what can be considered, poetic films that consider plot as a secondary function.  Honestly, I’m okay with that.  It’s different and, every now and then, it’s refreshing.

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto International Spring of Horror and Fantasy Film Festival ’17

The Toronto International Spring of Horror and Fantasy Film Festival is a weekend dedicated to genre appreciation conceived by filmmakers Lari Teräs and Jon Lewis.  The festival returns to the city’s indie hot spot Carlton Cinema on Friday, April 7 and carries through to Sunday, April 9, promising movie goers an eclectic three-day event filled with music videos, short films, and unique movies that are out-of-this-world.

Reviews

Obit

By: Jessica Goddard Obit is an irresistibly insightful film that completely delivers on its implicit promise to answer every question you ever had about obituaries (plus the questions you didn’t know you had).

Reviews

Wilson

By: Nick Ferwerda Wilson (Woody Harrelson) is a lonely man who is maybe a bit too honest.  He struggles to adapt to the modern-age of communication, which only irritates his lack of social awareness, but he’s truly shook up when his father passes away – the only family member Wilson had left in his life.