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Articles by Wylie Writes Staff

Reviews

Last Flag Flying

By: Jessica Goddard Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying is a touching, exquisitely-performed road trip drama, full of insight and engaging questions for the modern era.  This is a movie that never stops breaking your heart, while it keeps you guessing at all the right moments.  It’s both patriotic and skeptical;  somehow inspiring and disillusioning.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Once Upon a Time at Christmas’

By: Trevor Chartrand While the concept of a homicidal Santa Claus has certainly been explored in slasher films like Santa’s Slay and Silent Night, Deadly Night, director Paul Tanter has found a surprisingly fresh approach to the ‘Killer Claus’ trope in Once Upon a Time at Christmas.  This fun and festive Canadian B-movie will give viewers a reason to keep the Christmas lights on overnight.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Kill Order’

By: Trevor Chartrand Kill Order is essentially a Crank film without the charisma or charm.  It tries hard to be pulse-pounding and slick, but this punch-a-minute action flick is all fist and no fury.  Given the film’s structure, it’s not surprising to learn writer/director James Mark has a lot of stunt department work on his resume, including action-driven films like Jumper and Pacific Rim.  Kill Order favours style over substance, desperately stringing a series of…

Reviews

Mudbound

By: Trevor Chartrand Showcasing the contrast between two farming families in Mississippi, Mudbound examines the overbearing racist climate of the southern states in the 1940s.  Based on a novel of the same name and directed/co-written by Dee Rees, the film takes place both during and after the Second World War.  When a white family takes ownership of a Mississippi farm, they find themselves living in the fields among the black farmhands who will work for them….

Reviews

Lady Bird

By: Trevor Chartrand The meandering narrative of Lady Bird, though at times unfocused and opened-ended, is both heartwarming and humorous as it examines the life of a struggling teen overwhelmed by dysfunction and her perceived notion of persecution at every turn.  An offbeat coming-of-age comedy, Lady Bird wonderfully depicts the innocence of youth in search of love, purpose, and acceptance in a confusing and changing world.

Reviews

Infinity Baby

By: Nick van Dinther Hollywood is often criticized for rehashing the same ideas repeatedly without bringing anything new to the table.  At the very least, Infinity Baby bucks that trend and brings us something we haven’t seen before.