Latest

Short Film

Festival Coverage

Scholarly Shorts @ Toronto Short Film Festival ’15

By: Addison Wylie I tend to think I cover a lot of film festivals; especially those who screen short films.  However, the Toronto Short Film Festival (March 16 – March 20 at Toronto’s Carlton Cinema) is new to me. By grazing over TSFF’s mission statement, the festival blends into the collection of similar screenings in the GTA.  That said, I investigated more and was corrected.  The Toronto Short Film Festival has a wide roster of…

Festival Coverage

Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival ’14: The Shorts

By: Addison Wylie Before another year of moviegoing goes into full swing, TIFF respectively collects a list of features and short films that astounded audiences and erupted conversation within the past year. TIFF’s annual Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival began on January 2 with Sturla Gunnarsson’s documentary Monsoon, and continues with other Canadian favourites such as Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Susan Avingaq’s doc Sol, as well as Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, which sparked buzz after the Québécois filmmaker won…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Uncommon Enemies & Ejecta

Uncommon Enemies (DIR. Alex Hatz) By: Addison Wylie A late-night rendezvous between a Nazi (played by James Gangl) and a seductive mademoiselle (played by Melanie Scrofano) is interrupted by a couple of American soldiers.  When discovered, the Sergeant (played by Flashpoint’s Michael Cram) and the Nazi hold each other at gunpoint, while the French miss tends to the wounded Private (played by AJ Vaage). Uncommon Enemies is a comedic period piece that tries too hard…

Festival Coverage

Affective and Absurd: A Toronto Youth Shorts Preview

The Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival is a terrific way for young filmmakers to enter the scene.  It’s a festival run by responsible believers who maintain faith in future generations of storytellers. The film festival has also given hard-working individuals a deserving premiere in an appreciated Toronto-bound theatrical venue.  The awards ceremony is an added bonus to those seeking genuine recognition, as well as constructive criticism by a panel of educated peers. This year, movie…

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2014: Short Cuts with Sorrow

By: Addison Wylie We return to the Short Cuts Canada programmes to take a look at a few films that aren’t afraid to get “real”. Well, “real” in surreal surroundings and under crazy circumstances. These three shorts may be tales out of a book (certainly in the case of The Underground), but the emotion conveyed is what makes these stories come alive. They hit and miss various points, but the risks these filmmakers take are nothing…

Articles

An Apocalypse at Toronto Youth Shorts’ T24

By: Addison Wylie The T24 project – a challenge in association with the Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival – asks filmmakers to create, produce, edit, and hand in a short film within 24 hours.  Teams are given a lengthy essay question about the chosen theme, and are then sent off into the city. I remember the days of attending T24 screenings and feeling excited to tell others about the great shorts that screened.  With prior…

Reviews

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’13: Pitch Black Laughs

Sitting in the theatre on the last night of the Toronto After Dark Film Festival is bittersweet. While one week is the perfect duration for a genre festival that pushes the wee hours of the night, it’s still tough to say “goodbye” to an event that almost always delivered on quality. The last day of the festival ended with the dark comedy Cheap Thrills and acclaimed thriller Big Bad Wolves – which also happens to…

Reviews

The Days God Slept

By: Addison Wylie There are short films that get wrapped up in their own mysterious styles and murky vagueness, and then there’s Jeremiah Kipp’s The Days God Slept. Kipp’s short film skates awfully close to being just another brick in the surrealistic wall but its consistency to its characters and story is what saves it, making it a memorable watch. The Days God Slept gives the power to the audience to assume the context of…

Reviews

Movie 43

By: Addison Wylie Movie 43 is an anthology film with a stacked cast. It’s been pushing its alleged “audacity” and “outrageousness” in order to get YOU in that theatre seat. However, there is something to be said about how much the marketing has pushed that angle in our faces. When a movie is urging moviegoers to focus on an element about the movie (in this case, its sheer outlandishness) instead of the actual movie itself…