Latest

Netflix

Reviews

Naked

Marlon Wayans, Michael Tiddes, and Rick Alvarez take a break from spoofing horror flicks (the Haunted House series) and mainstream smut (Fifty Shades of Black) to present Naked, a Netflix Original (and remake of 2000’s Sweden comedy Naken) that borrows the framework of narrative-looping to make a funny and surprisingly sweet movie that you’ll want to watch over and over again.

Reviews

Okja

By: Jessica Goddard Bong Joon-ho’s Okja is not only packed with insight, imagination, and action, but mesmerizing visual effects.  While this movie bounces around tonally, it’s consistently engaging and gripping.  There are moments of camp and farce and exaggeration (cough cough – Jake Gyllenhaal – cough) but they are fun and mostly harmless.  The premise is well-conceived, and the frequent use of subtitles under Korean dialogue is never fatiguing.

Reviews

Shimmer Lake

Shimmer Lake is Coen Brothers-lite, yet it aspires to be a film worthy enough to stand beside those famous quirky noirs from the Academy-Award winners.  That would require Oren Uziel’s movie to be outrageous, which it isn’t.  An unfortunate discovery considering the leads are terrific comedic actors.

Reviews

Win It All

Life can fluctuate, and I believe that’s the point Win It All is trying to make.  Then again, filmmaker Joe Swanberg may have just set out to make a straightforward character study, in which case that works too.

Reviews

Sandy Wexler

After nearly a decade of bad comedies starring Adam Sandler, it feels weird to call his recent vehicle “good”.  It’s also funny, good-natured, and features Sandler at the top of his form.  Somebody pinch me.

Reviews

iBoy

I know dark and serious superhero movies have been “in” since Christopher Nolan perfected the genre with The Dark Knight and Deadpool proved heroes can be a lil’ naughty, but Adam Randall’s Netflix joint iBoy should be the last one of these clones for a while.

Reviews

Take the 10

The trailer for Netflix’s Take the 10 does no favours for this surprising flick.  It plays up slapstick yucks and crude dialogue, and, worst of all, it believes its the first movie to incorporate violent thugs in broad comedy – it’s detrimental advertising.  Luckily, writer/director/star Chester Tam has a trick up his sleeve.