Netflix

Reviews

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

Netflix’s To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is too slight and trivial even by teen movie standards, but I’m hoping it will make its young viewers talk to each other more.  So many misunderstandings and rumours in Sofia Alvarez’s stalled screenplay would’ve been squashed if people had stopped their worrying and had simple conversations with other characters.

Reviews

Like Father

Having co-founded Hilarity for Charity with her husband, along with appearing in a handful of comedies (For a Good Time, Call…, Sausage Party), Lauren Miller Rogen flexes her filmmaking muscles in her directorial feature debut Like Father, Netflix’s latest dramedy.

Reviews

Alex Strangelove

Craig Johnson (director/co-writer of The Skeleton Twins) returns with another sweet story about solving personal ambiguity with wonder, caution, and experience in Netflix’s Alex Strangelove.  This time, the angst takes place in high school, as Johnson evolves the “teen sex comedy” sub-genre with positive (and current) messages of sexual orientation.

Reviews

Kodachrome

Before making Kodachrome, filmmaker Mark Raso directed Copenhagen and screenwriter Jonathan Tropper wrote This Is Where I Leave You.  Both of those were modest movies with family drama and pleasant dynamics.  Kodachrome is more of the same from these two men, which is good for Netflix audiences looking for an easy watch, but slightly disappointing for movie goers expecting more than unchallenging schmaltz.

Reviews

Paradox

Netflix is a juggernaut of content, and they’re still breaking the mould.  Just take Daryl Hannah’s Paradox, for instance.  Who could’ve guessed the streaming service could turn your living room into a snooty arthouse theatre?  That’s a flippant comment but, boy, is Paradox excruciatingly smug.  How do you rate or review this movie?  Is this even a movie?

Reviews

A Futile and Stupid Gesture

It makes sense for David Wain to direct a biopic about Doug Kenney.  The absurdist director of Wet Hot American Summer, Role Models, and Wanderlust works with a special brand of off-beat comedy as Kenney’s National Lampoon brainchild did.  Even though the biopic genre is new ground for Wain, A Futile and Stupid Gesture is still a comedy cut from familiar cloth.