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Mongrel Media

Reviews

Jay & Silent Bob Reboot

Kevin Smith and Jason Mewes reprise their self-made iconic roles, New Jersey’s infamous stoners Jay and Silent Bob, in Jay & Silent Bob Reboot.  While the film is certainly fan service, the results are funny, off-the-wall, and – dare I say – sweet.

Reviews

Wrinkles the Clown

When I hear the names “Michael Beach Nichols and Christopher K. Walker” attached to a project, I drop everything I’m doing.  These two filmmakers are showcasing outstanding work in the documentary genre.  Their doc Welcome to Leith, about white supremacists targeting and flipping a small town into their own personal basecamp, was a terrifying look at the escalation of evil.  At first glance, their latest film Wrinkles the Clown looks to be as scary.  Their…

Reviews

Cunningham

With Cunningham, director Alla Kovgan has made a biographical documentary about deceased choreographer Merce Cunningham that, I believe, he would’ve been happy with.  The tribute has been tailor-made to emulate his unique style of dance and movement;  from the individual dance reenactments directed with precision by Jennifer Goggans to Kovgan’s tour of Cunningham’s career through curated interviews from performers he worked with in his dance company.

Reviews

I See You

Adam Randall’s thriller I See You is so good, it hurts.  Seriously though, because I’m biting my tongue.  I want to gush about this fantastic movie so much, but talking about it in detail would be a disservice.  The film dishes out so many surprises and they all stick a miraculous landing.

Reviews

The Nightingale

The Nightingale is Jennifer Kent’s filmmaking follow-up to her cult hit The Babadook.  Continuing her career in discovering horror threaded within suppressed memories, Kent weaves a period drama about redemption after trauma.

Reviews

Knives Out

By: Jolie Featherstone Director Rian Johnson (Looper, Star Wars: Episode XIII – The Last Jedi) makes a triumphant return to his whodunnit-loving form with Knives Out.  Fourteen years after his much-loved debut feature, Brick, a passionately-told film noir set in a modern-day Southern California high school, Johnson’s Knives Out charmed audiences with one of the most talked-about films at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Reviews

Pain and Glory

By: Trevor Chartrand Pedro Almodóvar’s Pain and Glory is a well-crafted melodrama;  an emotional piece weighed heavily by its evocation of sadness and regret.  The film stars Antonio Banderas as Salvador Mallo, an aging filmmaker who reflects on his past and the mistakes he’s made – mistakes that seem more clear through older, wiser eyes.  Almodóvar explores themes of life, love, family, regret, and retribution, all through the lens of the classic mantra: ‘hindsight is…