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Military Wives

Military Wives has been tailor-made to be a crowd-pleaser.  The ingredients are there: the leading characters have an entertaining dynamic that plays on their opposite personalities, they lead a team of underdogs, nostalgic pop tunes are worshipped amongst the film’s kind-hearted humour, a strong patriotic backbone holds up a story that’s been loosely based on real events.  As much as it bugs me that the filmmakers believe they’ve cracked the code to pleasing general audiences…

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The Roads Not Taken

Sometimes, a filmmaker will come up with a unique, unprecedented concept and turn it into a one-of-a-kind feature.  More often than not, however, the concept confounds the creative;  leading to a muddled mess that disappoints the viewer even more than the average bad effort.  Case in point: The Roads Not Taken.  It’s the latest film from once-celebrated English filmmaker Sally Potter, a woman who once managed to turn the perplexing Orlando into a film, which…

Reviews

The Assistant

The Assistant is a faithful portrayal of workplace harassment. Drawing from her experience as a documentarian (Ukraine Is Not a Brothel), writer/director Kitty Green brings layers of realism which she channels well through her actors. I think Green’s vision is admirable, but I completely understand if audiences feel disregarded watching the movie.

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Robert the Bruce

Intended as a sequel, of sorts, to Braveheart, Robert the Bruce sees Angus MacFadyen (Braveheart, Alive) reprise his role as the titular Scottish king.  Unfortunately, this is one of those movies with all the right ingredients – but no spark.

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Hope Gap

One thing that can be said in Hope Gap’s favour is that it has a strong sense of place.  Filmed in Seaford, Sussex, the stunning white cliffs, quaint village streets, and the dark stone beaches are displayed wonderfully.  Hope Gap is, at points, a visually beautiful film;  unfortunately, it isn’t a particularly interesting one.

Reviews

True Fiction

What role does the precarity of labour play in young people choosing to take on dangerous jobs?  In the #MeToo era, how does one go about separating an artist’s actions from their work?  Is anonymity possible in the 21st century?  What is the difference between violence and a simulation of violence?  If unethical acts lead to brilliant art, is it ethical to consume the art?  What do these questions have in common?  Well, for one, they…

Reviews

The Jesus Rolls

The Jesus Rolls, a semi-spiritual sequel to 1998’s cult classic The Big Lebowski, is a film for those who watched the original Coen Brothers comedy and became enamoured by John Turturro’s character.  It’s hard not to be distracted by the sheer weirdness of Jesus Quintana, infamous sex offender and intimidating bowler.  Turturro played the role curiously in a way that made audiences wonder “outside of the bowling alley, what’s life like for The Jesus?”

Reviews

Ordinary Love

Ordinary Love is a superb drama with slight notes of ice-breaking wit.  It’s orchestrated along the same lines as 2017 Oscar nominee The Big Sick or last year’s Netflix sleeper Paddleton (both of which, funnily enough, co-star Ray Romano but I digress), only the premise of a middle-aged married couple coming to terms with an alarming cancer diagnosis is played, as expected, a bit more sullen.

Reviews

The Assistant

By: Jessica Goddard The day after I saw this movie, I got an ad for it on Facebook.  According to the post promoted on my timeline, Time Out New York had given Kitty Green’s The Assistant five stars, and called it a “flawless thriller.”  I can’t disagree that The Assistant is a good, worthwhile movie, but calling it a thriller is a stretch.  Especially when what makes it work so well is its very objective,…

Reviews

Rosie

Rosie is a realistic depiction of a family experiencing sudden homelessness.  After their rented house is sold by their landlord without much time to prepare for change, daily life becomes a struggle to find a place to sleep.  Parents Rosie and John Paul (Sarah Greene, Moe Dunford) scramble to find vacancies in local hotels, keeping the truth away from their four children.