LevelFilm

Reviews

Make Up

Claire Oakley’s Make Up tells the story of a young woman named Ruth (Molly Windsor) who goes to a trailer park in Cornwall to be with her boyfriend, where she learns that he may be cheating on her.  As she attempts to come to terms with this realization, she begins to come to terms with the fact that she may be gay, as she finds herself obsessed with another woman.  This is a story that…

Reviews

The Dissident

By: Trevor Chartrand Informative and eye-opening, The Dissident is a haunting documentary that’s shockingly timely and relevant, especially considering last week’s siege in Washington.  Among other things, this film demonstrates the dangerous potential of social media when used in the wrong way.

Reviews

Survival Skills

The police have always been fertile territory for mockery;  from the bumbling cop who always misses the crime to the surly “good cop” who gets shot two days before retirement.  In the last decade, however, that mockery has become problematized in and of itself, whether by people who think that the police should be above reproach or people who think that making light of the police normalizes their brutality.  As such, police satire needs to walk a…

Reviews

Rocks

Sarah Gavron’s Rocks is a realist coming-of-age drama that follows a young girl of colour, “Rocks” (Bukky Bakray), as she struggles caring for her younger brother after their mother leaves without warning.  Aggressively directed and acted, Rocks offers a poignant intersectional look at race, poverty, and gender in the context of the United Kingdom, where the racial tensions–let alone economic tensions–triggered by Brexit are flourishing.

Reviews

His Master’s Voice

György Pálfi’s His Master’s Voice is a thoroughly confusing, questionably plotted sci-fi film that is hindered by a myriad of subplots, vague ideas, and an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to combine traditional fictional filmmaking practices with mock-documentary elements.

Reviews

Nadia, Butterfly

Pascal Plante’s Nadia, Butterfly eerily takes place at the now-cancelled 2020 Tokyo Olympics, and follows a French Canadian Olympian swimmer as she participates in her final event as a professional athlete.  Lovingly directed yet glacially paced, Nadia, Butterfly boasts some excellent performances and cinematography, but struggles to overcome its vague characterizations and meandering screenplay.

Reviews

Parallel Minds

Benjamin Ross Hayden’s futuristic sci-fi Parallel Minds begins with the invention of Red Eye 2, an improved ocular device that allows you to relive precious memories and record new ones.  As the launch approaches, Red Eye researcher Margo (Tommie-Amber Pirie) works closely with the product’s head developer.  In a shocking turn, the developer turns up dead;  prompting a withered detective, Thomas (Greg Bryk), to look for answers behind the alleged murder.  Margo assists him because,…

Reviews

Feels Good Man

“The death of the author” is a concept that has become more and more relevant with the advancement of the internet as a platform for artistic expression.  In a world where a piece frequently finds itself separated from its creator and spread far and wide without context, there is very little recourse to reconnect one’s name to their creation, let alone decide its direction.  Arthur Jones’ documentary Feels Good Man details an extreme example of…

Reviews

Tito

Tito is an immersive sensory experience that reminds me of what I love best about film as a medium: its ability to place the viewer within unfamiliar bodies, minds, and environments.