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Nadia, Butterfly

Pascal Plante’s Nadia, Butterfly eerily takes place at the now-cancelled 2020 Tokyo Olympics, and follows a French Canadian Olympian swimmer as she participates in her final event as a professional athlete.  Lovingly directed yet glacially paced, Nadia, Butterfly boasts some excellent performances and cinematography, but struggles to overcome its vague characterizations and meandering screenplay.

Reviews

Parallel Minds

Benjamin Ross Hayden’s futuristic sci-fi Parallel Minds begins with the invention of Red Eye 2, an improved ocular device that allows you to relive precious memories and record new ones.  As the launch approaches, Red Eye researcher Margo (Tommie-Amber Pirie) works closely with the product’s head developer.  In a shocking turn, the developer turns up dead;  prompting a withered detective, Thomas (Greg Bryk), to look for answers behind the alleged murder.  Margo assists him because,…

Reviews

Feels Good Man

“The death of the author” is a concept that has become more and more relevant with the advancement of the internet as a platform for artistic expression.  In a world where a piece frequently finds itself separated from its creator and spread far and wide without context, there is very little recourse to reconnect one’s name to their creation, let alone decide its direction.  Arthur Jones’ documentary Feels Good Man details an extreme example of…

Reviews

Tito

Tito is an immersive sensory experience that reminds me of what I love best about film as a medium: its ability to place the viewer within unfamiliar bodies, minds, and environments.

Reviews

Black Water: Abyss

In Andrew Trauki’s Black Water: Abyss, five friends set out to investigate an unexplored cave system in Australia, only to discover that the cave is inhabited by a crocodile with a hankering for fresh meat.  It’s a bit like someone decided it would be a good idea to mash together Lake Placid and The Descent (two movies I adore, despite their flaws) – but unfortunately, Black Water: Abyss lacks both the campy charm of the…

Reviews

Volition

By: Trevor Chartrand An edgy sci-fi thriller, Volition combines Back to the Future with Groundhog Day, though it takes a much darker approach.  Director/co-writer Tony Dean Smith takes audiences for an interesting ride in this day-in-the-life time travel story.

Reviews

Fisherman’s Friends

By: Trevor Chartrand Fisherman’s Friends is a charming little movie that celebrates the strength of a close community, shining its spotlight on a gang of quirky singing fisherman from Port Isaac, UK.  Unlike the throat lozenge brand that shares this same title, this film goes down smooth and easy – and it won’t leave a bad taste in your mouth.

Reviews

The Rest of Us

The Rest of Us needs a low triple-digit runtime, but sets up a needless challenge for itself to tell its story in under 80 minutes.  What’s the hurry?  And if filmmaker Aisling Chin-Yee has to compromise the narrative with condensed scenes and sharp edits to win the challenge, what’s the point?

Reviews

You Don’t Nomi

Jeffrey McHale’s documentary You Don’t Nomi dissects 1995’s much maligned racy drama Showgirls in a similar way that Rodney Aster’s Room 237 delved into different theories on Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining. Both films are about how cult interest breathed new life into a filmmaker’s original vision, however the difference between the documentaries stems from their points of interest. Room 237 was about how movie goers have interpreted visual totems within the film. You…