Independent

CrowdFUNding

CrowdFUNding: ‘Deep Shock’ and ‘The Date’

By: Addison Wylie Back when I was writing for Film Army, I would occasionally get requests from filmmakers to review their short films.  Davide Melini and Rob Comeau were two of those people, and CrowdFUNding has reunited me with them. Melini – an Italian filmmaker with a fascination for  faith – and Comeau – a Canadian moviemaker with an eye for style – strike different chords with their work.  It’s awesome to see these two haven’t…

Reviews

Making the Rules

By: Addison Wylie Mustering through Making the Rules is like watching a bunch of people try and sail using only the framework of a boat. The film marks the acting debut of musician Robin Thicke.  This triggers a question right off the bat: is watching thespian Thicke as painful as it sounds?  My answer may disappoint those wanting me to slam the Blurred Lines hit maker.  I honestly couldn’t tell you if his performance is…

Reviews

Algonquin

By: Addison Wylie For better or for worse, Algonquin is unpredictable.  What starts as Canada’s independent answer to last year’s Academy Award nominee Nebraska finds unique footing after a detour in its narrative. I suppose any film related site listing the synopsis for Jonathan Hayes’ feature film debut would give away this major turn.  Because I certainly didn’t see it coming, I’ll back away from that specific spoiler.  It’s an example of how Hayes isn’t…

CrowdFUNding

CrowdFUNding: James Evans’ DIY Shakespeare

  By: Addison Wylie I’ve always seen a bright future for actor James Evans.  James and I attended the same high school and we were fortunate to take part in a few stage productions together.  He’s  a really sharp and talented guy who – to my memory – does a spot-on Don Knotts. Where James and I differ is with Shakespeare.  I’ve always had a difficult time grasping onto William Shakespeare’s writing.  Evans not only…

Reviews

AKP: Job 27

By: Addison Wylie When the only bad thing about your feature film debut is its marble-mouthed title, it’s a sign that your ambitious film is close to being sublime. When you get past that weak title, AKP: Job 27 is a really good time at the movies.  It treads trodden ground by being centred around a private hitman on a mission in unfamiliar territory (the territory being Toronto), but its Michael L. Suan’s vision of…

Reviews

Stranger by the Lake

By: Addison Wylie The realism in Stranger by the Lake (or, L’Inconnu du lac) is what initially draws audiences in.  It’s paced deliberately slow to match life’s sunny tranquilities, and the cruising men who attend this private beach looking for a getaway and the occasional hook up come across as real people. Stranger by the Lake is uneventful for the most part, but its serenely baked atmosphere is musing.  Once a dangerous dramatic turn comes into play, that…

Reviews

The Spectacular Now

By: Addison Wylie The Spectacular Now is the movie about high school I wish I had growing up.  It’s easily identifiable and relatable to anyone who felt growing pains or knew someone having a wobbly time through secondary education. James Ponsoldt’s coming-of-age dramedy features two exceptional performances from up-and-comers Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley, who play unexpected friends who eventually become smitten with each other.  Though, Teller’s motormouth Sutter Keely won’t directly admit it since…

Reviews

The Lifeguard

By: Addison Wylie  The Lifeguard deals with the discouraging feeling of going nowhere and the urge to flee home for comfort.  It’s a circumstance that some of us may be all too familiar with; especially those who are fresh out of their post-secondary education.  Liz W. Garcia’s film, however, gets very little right about events that take place after the retreat to a personal turf. Garcia is able to capture that initial awkwardness that ensues…

Reviews

MSC: The Movie

MSC: The Movie is the fabric of a parent’s nightmare. After countless bleeding hearts complaining about imitations inspired by shows like Jackass and underground guilty pleasures like Bumfights, Peter Guzda and his knucklehead cronies come along with a movie that proves all of them right. In the early 2000’s, Guzda started high school with an open mind.  He soon met up with other students who shared a similar sense of humour and boredom.  Welland, Ontario…

Reviews

The Brass Teapot

By: Addison Wylie The Brass Teapot wants to be a rags-to-riches fairytale with an offbeat, darker tone.  Director Ramaa Mosley along with Tim Macy’s screenplay, however, don’t want to fully commit to a twisted vicinity for fear they’ll lose their quirky image and potential likability.  Even though the film doesn’t take huge risks, it still manages to find a way to be consistently appealing. Alice and John (played by Juno Temple and Michael Angarano) are…