Gravitas Ventures

Reviews

Alright Now

Jamie Adams’ Alright Now, a romantic dramedy following a rock star following a particularly brutal double breakup, boasts that it is completely improvised.  Here’s the funny thing about improvisation: you need actors who are good at it.

Reviews

Benched

Benched is a no-brainer recommendation for sports movie fans.  It’s charming, funny and, despite its rote concepts, the filmmakers put forth enough effort to give audiences something different.

Reviews

Broken Star

The central character in Dave Schwep’s Broken Star is a young actress fallen from grace: a drug-addicted, manipulative monster.  Markey Marlowe (Crazy, Stupid, Love’s Analeigh Tipton) – a character and name that sounds like it’s come right out of a 1940s film noir – is placed on house arrest, with her only company being reclusive landlord Daryl (Tyler Labine of Mountain Men), whose grandmother has recently passed away.  Over time, Marlowe manipulates Daryl into attacking those…

Reviews

Another Soul

Another Soul will remind viewers of other movies.  It’s an echo of supernatural horror stories told before featuring demons, possessions, conflicted parents, and exorcisms.  But, Another Soul is also a shoestring effort working with limited resources that no one would truly want to slam because the cast and crew are simply “doing their best”.  This, perhaps, could’ve acted as an excuse to criticize Paul Chau’s film on a curve, but I’m afraid the Paranormal Activity franchise has…

Reviews

Score: A Film Music Documentary

There’s not much to say about Matt Schrader’s ever imaginatively titled Score: A Film Music Documentary.  A documentary made in praise of the Hollywood elite composers (who, to be fair, deserve the praise), Score has the presentation quality of a TV special or DVD bonus feature with no original thoughts about its subject.

Reviews

Blood, Sand and Gold

Blood, Sand and Gold is touted as a low-budget blockbuster.  The globetrotting adventure was made for $258,000 in less than two months, and it doesn’t show.  The film isn’t modest (lavish scenery and accessories hog the screen), but the production does a commendable job disguising itself.  In spite of cutting costs, Blood, Sand and Gold is still 24 karat schlock.