Dark Comedy

Reviews

Triangle of Sadness

Triangle of Sadness pitches itself as a sophisticated comedy with “biting” satire about elitist attitudes during class wars.  However, the jabs made by writer/director Ruben Östlund are nothing more than the filmmaker taking swings at low-hanging fruit for a ridiculously long runtime;  intercut occasionally by tired attempts to be outrageous to offset an arthouse reputation.

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2022: ‘Triangle of Sadness’

Triangle of Sadness pitches itself as a sophisticated comedy with “biting” satire about elitist attitudes during class wars.  However, the jabs made by writer/director Ruben Östlund are nothing more than the filmmaker taking hackneyed swings at low-hanging fruit for a really, really long time.

Reviews

Funny Pages

As rude and unappealing Funny Pages can be, it’s a brutally honest and funny character study of a young artist who channels trauma and grief into his aspirations to be a successful cartoonist.  A true tale of an unlikely opportunist.

Reviews

I Love My Dad

At the root of a dark comedy is sadness.  Some examples may take more effort to trace back to that forlorn emotion, but the premise usually begins with an unfortunate circumstance and then carried beyond the point of comfort or absurdism;  ideally to create humour.  It’s all about finding amusing, and sometimes inappropriate, ways of interpreting that sadness.  And, I Love My Dad is successful most of the time.

Reviews

Vengeance

By: Jeff Ching Despite the title, Vengeance is really not a revenge movie (though revenge is part of the plot), and it’s especially not an action movie. Actually, it’s much better and smarter than what you’d expect.  It’s a very ambitious film that attempts many things: it’s a fish-out-of-water comedy with a dark sense of humour, a murder mystery, it’s satirical, it’s philosophical.  The movie has a lot to say about the current state of America…

Reviews

Honor Society

From Awesomeness Films (You Get Me, Spontaneous, Netflix’s To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before series) comes Honor Society, a teen movie that’s darker than expected.  Considering how annoying the film’s smug trailer was, I appreciated this unexpected edgier approach.  However, the execution is imperfect and isn’t nearly as measured as it should be.

Reviews

Apples

Produced and completed during our current era of COVID, Apples is a strange and accidentally timely import from Greece, following a vacant mind (Aris Servetalis) during the early stages of a pandemic that’s quietly sweeping over the public.  Victims who are affected by the unknown sickness lose their memory at the drop of a hat.  Those who don’t have any immediate support are referred to a rehabilitation program for the unidentifiable where they must complete…

Reviews

Stanleyville

By: Jeff Ching I was excited when I found out that Stanleyville was the feature directorial debut of Maxwell McCabe-Lokos, who wrote 2013’s The Father – one of the most criminally underrated dark comedies of all time.  The Father was a Canadian film about a husband and father trying to move on with his life after dealing with the shocking news of his wife getting arrested for cheating on him…with a minor.  What a concept, and a hilariously…

Reviews

Dual

Dual is a nifty near-future sci-fi that starts with an interesting and obviously satirical premise and elevates it to make comments on the dire state of personal interactivity.  It’s well-trodden territory for this genre, but writer/director Riley Stearns (The Art of Self-Defense) still finds original ways to keep his audience laughing, entertained, and on their toes.