Comedy

Reviews

Coffee & Kareem

Director Michael Dowse comes from an eclectic filmography, but he’s becoming the go-to guy for mainstream fare. He recently brought audiences Stuber, which was an efficient buddy comedy but aggressively ordinary. But, following up a bland movie with something so unfunny and foul will make you value mediocrity. That’s *exactly* what happens with Dowse’s Netflix Original Coffee & Kareem, one of the worst movies of the year.

Reviews

It Started As a Joke

By: Trevor Chartrand It Started as a Joke is an emotionally charged documentary that will sort-of sneak up on you.  It’s so sneaky in fact, that the film will try to convince you that you’re watching ‘just another Netflix-style comedy special’ – until you’re suddenly not.  You’ll let your guard down, laughing with the featured comedians, chuckling at their on and off stage antics.  It’s funny, it’s goofy, and it’s a great time… and then…

Reviews

Vivarium

Vivarium works as jet-black satire about the pressures of fulfilling roles that have been imposed by a seemingly unanimous understanding of tradition.  It’s existentially dour, but these dissatisfied emotions from director Lorcan Finnegan and screenwriter Garret Shanley are supposed to identify how normalized expectations are not so much a failsafe plan for people, but actually a suffocating framework.

Reviews

My Spy

My Spy is the latest addition to a very specific sub-genre that features a rough n’ tough action star dialling it down to shape a more family-friendly image.  Dave Bautista, of Guardians of the Galaxy fame, reports for duty in My Spy, following in the steps of fellow wrestlers John Cena and Tyler Mane (Playing With Fire), Vin Diesel (The Pacifier), and Arnold Schwarzenegger (Kindergarten Cop).  The film that has had the most persuasion over…

Reviews

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit, written and directed by Taika Waititi, is a risqué movie that reminded me of classic comedies made by the legendary Mel Brooks.  The film risks being offensive to lampoon racism, including its different perspectives by persecuting followers, and to draw parallels to current arrogant behaviour thrusted upon minorities.  Waititi solves the puzzle to make his satire work, but also doesn’t distill the severity of past hate crimes in this period piece.

Reviews

Standing Up, Falling Down

Standing Up, Falling Down is a really nice dramedy about people finding and relating to each other.  It’s funny, touching, performed well, and directed with fluency by newcomer Matt Ratner.  As far as movies go about characters leaning on comedy as a crutch to hide their true emotions, the film is the best of its kind since Judd Apatow’s Funny People.

Reviews

Come to Daddy

Most movies build towards a crescendo, yet the first act of Ant Timpson’s Come to Daddy is the climax.  But then, instead of gradually hitting new heights, Timpson’s film simmers to a tepid temperature.  Despite the outrageous feedback you may have heard about the movie’s wild qualities, Come to Daddy is actually family tame (if you’re used to off-the-wall genre pieces).

Reviews

Appiness

YidLife Crisis co-creator Eli Batalion makes his feature-length filmmaking debut with Appiness, a film that aspires to be a timeless buddy comedy but somewhat expires as a bland underdog story.

Reviews

Little Monsters

Little Monsters is a common zombie movie that’s been inspired by contemporary horror comedies (especially Shaun of the Dead’s slacker humour).  The reason it doesn’t fall into obscurity among the wash of other copycats is because the film stays light and merry while balancing morbid laughs.

Reviews

Reality Queen!

Meet London Logo (Julia Faye West), an arrogant heiress who has somehow found fame for being present.  At one time, her elegance was popular.  But now, she clings on to any shred of attention by releasing music, an autobiography, and rebooting an on-air partnership with partygoer Rochelle Ritzy (Shelli Boone).  The pressure for relevance stems from her fear of being pushed out by trendy, big-bootied celebrity, Kristy Kim (Candace Kita).  As journalist Diana Smelt-Marlin (Kate…