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Reviews

The King of Staten Island

The King of Staten Island is another win for director Judd Apatow, who last left movie goers with his career-best work in Trainwreck.  It appears, though, that the filmmaker was preparing for The King of Staten Island with Trainwreck.  Just as he gave comedienne Amy Schumer a platform to expand on her own stand-up about her self-consciousness with the opposite sex, he gives SNL comic Pete Davidson this movie to explore his upbringing in this,…

Reviews

Uncle Peckerhead

The first hurdle of any music-centric film is often the most difficult to clear: the music itself.  It’s difficult to get the audience to root for the heroes if their band’s sound is cringe-inducing.  Or, even worse, if it’s just plain boring.

Reviews

Bill & Ted Face the Music

The much awaited and presumably final instalment in the Bill & Ted series, Bill & Ted Face the Music, pulls off the impossible feat of being a faithful and charming sequel to cult classics.  For that, the production should be very proud of their efforts and patience.  However, the movie itself is neither “excellent” or “bogus”.  It’s just, sort of, “chill”.

Reviews

Steve-O: Gnarly

The title of Steve-O’s new comedy special Gnarly, as expected, describes the stunt work peppered throughout the show as he raises the bar on his own shock factor with squeamish spectacles.  However, the special should almost be titled Mea Culpa considering his stand-up routine, while off-the-wall, is holding his past destructive behaviour in contempt.

Reviews

Enter the Fat Dragon

For a film titled Enter the Fat Dragon, the film doesn’t stew in heavyweight humour or reminisce on kung-fu nostalgia.  When it does, it’s brief and appropriately justified for the story.  A breath of fresh air when compared to other comedies that cash in on references and obvious prosthetics.

Reviews

Spinster

One of the best things to happen to 21st century genre cinema is the transgression that comes with newer understandings of social norms.  After about one hundred years of cinema, the tropes of classic Hollywood became less of a necessity and more of a suggestion, allowing filmmakers to tell stories that go against the grain when it comes to the necessities of living.