Canadian

Reviews

22 Chaser

With 22 Chaser, director Rafal Sokolowski gives Toronto a vibrancy and grit usually associated with big American cities.  This edgy vision efficiently (and stylistically) projects the aggressive nature between the film’s competitive characters, who are trying hard to earn their keep.

Reviews

The Lockpicker

A teenager’s public suicide sends shockwaves through their high school, as students and teachers alike reel and cope.  On the fringe of the tragedy is Hashi, a shy creative writer who had a close friendship with the victim.  Being generally shy and uncomfortable to begin with, Hashi – despite finding an emotional connection through poetry – doesn’t know how to exhale his pain.  Unfortunately, he chooses ways to grieve that are detrimental to his life.

Reviews

Prodigals

By: Trevor Chartrand Michelle Ouellet’s Prodigals depicts a feeling as much as a narrative.  Based on a stage play of the same name, the film is about a group of 20-somethings reflecting on their lives, and coming to terms with the emptiness staring back at them.  While it may sound bleak and unsettling, the film isn’t without a few shimmering rays of hope.

Reviews

Super Troopers 2

After 17 years, the sporadically-anticipated sequel to the 2001’s Super Troopers has pulled into cinemas.  Written and starring the Broken Lizard comedy troupe (Jay Chandrasekhar, Paul Soter, Steve Lemme, Erik Stolhanske, Kevin Heffernan) and directed by their very own Chandrasekhar, Super Troopers 2 is what you would expect from a sequel of a cult classic.

Reviews

Love Jacked

Maya (22 Jump Street’s Amber Stevens West) is left scrambling when she finds her fiancé “fooling around” with another girl.  Having met the man of her dreams while visiting Africa, she returns home with a lie that will convince her parents that she still has her life on track.  A kind stranger named Malcolm (Shamier Anderson) meets Maya during his own panic as a greedy former friend (Tyrell played by Lyriq Bent) chases him down….

Reviews

Mary Goes Round

Mary Goes Round is an acceptable gateway to long-form filmmaking for Canadian writer/director Molly McGlynn.  She comes prepared with a resume of shorts, of which I’ve only seen one (3-Way (Not Calling)).  It was so illustrious with its humour and honesty, that I started to anticipate McGlynn’s first feature-length film.