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Great Great Great

Great Great Great kicks off with a disconnected exchange following huge news.  Corporate worker Lauren (Sarah Kolasky) is told about her parents’ divorce by her mother.  Mom is aloof – almost to a numbing degree – but Lauren is shook up.  Her long-term relationship with Tom (Suck It Up’s Dan Beirne) is satisfyingly comfortable, but she suddenly fears of a future of boredom.  A flash-from-the-past in the form of a new co-worker/old friend (Richard Clarkin) triggers Lauren to…

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Joyce Wong

By: Jessica Goddard Wexford Plaza was one of the best films of 2017, and it was also a finalist for the Toronto Film Critic Association’s award for Best Canadian Film.  As the film celebrates its home release on digital platforms, I reached out to writer/director Joyce Wong to ask about her feature debut, its universal story, and her personal connection to the film.

Reviews

Birdland

By: Nick van Dinther Some films can be accused of lazy storytelling and a lack of risk.  Well, neither apply to Peter Lynch’s Birdland.  Unfortunately, Lynch’s convoluted ambition makes Birdland a very difficult film to follow.

Reviews

Wexford Plaza

By: Jessica Goddard When you first hear the plot of Wexford Plaza, you think you’ve probably seen this movie before or know exactly what its angle will be.  But you haven’t, and you don’t.  This 80-minute-long film has everything: humour, relatability, great pacing, precise and controlled energy, and a thoughtful commentary on the reality of our times.

Reviews

Suck It Up

Audiences were recently subjected to a tasteless dark comedy about understanding death called Considering Love & Other Magic.  Thankfully, movie goers can rebound with Suck It Up, another Canadian indie about comprehending grief that actually sticks its landing thanks to fantastic performances and Jordan Canning’s thoughtful direction.

Reviews

Considering Love & Other Magic

I didn’t believe anything in Considering Love & Other Magic.  These characters are so disengaged, you could set them on fire and all they would do is shrug.  They’re all too busy pondering about death;  mostly the long-term existentialism that lingers when a loved one passes away.  The press release describes Dave Schultz’s film as a “family movie”.  Try explaining that pitch to your kids.  You’ll owe them ice cream after the show.