Blumhouse

Reviews

The First Purge

The Purge wasn’t a typical horror film.  It was an intense bottle film that found ways to give movie goers the heebie-jeebies by poking holes in assumably safe conditions.  It also showcased nimble newcomer James DeMonaco, a skillful director who could use paranoia and predictability to deliver an engrossing movie.  DeMonaco directed the next two Purge movies – films I never saw but I’ve been eager to catch up with.  Hopefully, those films are better…

Reviews

Creep

By: Addison Wylie Around the time Patrick Brice’s sex comedy The Overnight hit theatres, movie goers were also presented with the filmmaker’s take on the horror behind obsession and abandonment in his seedy DIY flick called Creep. Creep is told from the perspective of Aaron, a videographer who is rolling lots of tape because he’s been told to.  Aaron has answered a Craigslist ad posted by someone who was in need of a cameraman to document a personal…

Reviews

The Gift

By: Trevor Jeffery The Gift isn’t an exception to the notion that suspense-thrillers lose substantial value on subsequent viewings, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be one hell of a ride the first time through. Simon (Jason Bateman) and Robyn (Rebecca Hall) seek a fresh start in California, not far from where Simon grew up.  An old high school acquaintance, Gordon (still going by his high school nickname, Gordo) (Joel Edgerton) approaches Simon and Robin…

Reviews

The Boy Next Door

By: Addison Wylie If Rob Cohen’s The Boy Next Door is an indication of anything, it’s that American filmmakers are still having grave difficulty making erotic thrillers without avoiding camp.  Nowadays, it’s almost a requirement for the movie to fly off the rails. A film like The Boy Next Door often has the viewer questioning if the filmmakers were making a bad movie on purpose.  A movie gullible audiences could innocently flock to and get…