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Art

Reviews

Loving Vincent

Loving Vincent wants you to focus hard on the six-year process it took to make this movie.  This oil-painted film is the first of its kind, with over 100 artists (including Canadian Valerie Fulford) painstakingly painting over 65,000 frames to make a cohesive cinematic work of art.  Each frame is in the signature swirly style of tortured painter Vincent van Gogh.

Reviews

White Night

There’s an art project titled White Night.  It’s a collaborative between five filmmakers (Sonny Atkins, P.H. Bergeron, Brian Hamilton, Matt Purdy, Dan Slater) and it chronicles six fictitious stories during Toronto’s Nuit Blanche – an all-nighter dedicated to art.  One of the characters, a struggling artist named Emily, contributes a cumbersome piece made entirely out of stacked cardboard boxes.  People pass by and heckle at it, while Emily fumes and eventually releases the tension through a…

Reviews

Manifesto

The craft of brilliant costume designers and make-up artists can transform the most recognizable actors into strangers.  Such is the case for Manifesto, a one-woman-show featuring two-time Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett portraying 13 different roles.  Of course, the production is also lucky to have one of the greatest living actors at the forefront.  However, what Manifesto also displays is that sometimes the best artists overshoot their target.

Festival Coverage

Hot Docs 2017: ‘Do Donkeys Act?’ and ‘Flames’

Do Donkeys Act? (DIR. David Redmon, Ashley Sabin) Do Donkeys Act? takes an animal that is not usually afforded much dignity – the donkey – and gives movie goers an opportunity to let the animals speak for themselves (without speaking). The film takes its audience to visit various donkey sanctuaries around the world, where donkeys that have been subjected to abuse or neglect are cared for, healed, and allowed to relax and retire.

Reviews

Miss Hokusai

The animation featured in Keiichi Hara’s anime Miss Hokusai is terrific.  A single cell has the ability to represent the humility and emotion of its characters, along with the imagination the film can achieve.  What’s peculiar and disappointing is how these images don’t make a cohesive film when edited together.

Reviews

Art Bastard

Victor Kanefsky’s Art Bastard asks broad questions about the relationship between art and politics.  Its subject, American artist Robert Cenedella, serves a micro-answer to some of these broad questions.  Although Kanefsky is successful in arguing for Cenedella’s work as critical satirical representations of U.S. political culture, the film lacks energy.