January 2015

Reviews

Housebound

By: Addison Wylie Housebound gives off the scent of a film written by multiple parties who want different things, even though the screenplay was solely written by director Gerard Johnstone. The film quickly develops an amusing dynamic between its two female leads.  Kylie (Played by Morgana O’Reilly) is a criminal forced to live under house arrest with her mother Miriam (played by Rima Te Wiata).  Mom would like to get along, but Kylie would rather…

Reviews

Corner Gas: The Movie

By: Addison Wylie Corner Gas: The Movie is a prime candidate for a review that requires me to cop out.  The bottom line: if you liked Corner Gas during its humbling five year run on television and have since enjoyed reruns in syndication, then you’ll enjoy its big screen debut.  But, let’s see if I can elaborate. The original cast of Canada’s beloved Corner Gas have reunited for an encore, which includes Saskatchewan funny man…

Reviews

I Put a Hit on You

By: Addison Wylie I Put a Hit on You is a movie with a hangover.  It doesn’t want to bother getting out of bed.  When it eventually does, it shuffles its feet from one end of 78 minutes to the other.  It’s found love on the festival circuit, and that makes me confused. Harper (played by Sara Canning) likes to be in control.  When a proposal to her boyfriend Ray (played by Aaron Ashmore) goes…

Reviews

Winter Sleep

By: Addison Wylie Toronto’s new year begins with Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s observant film, Winter Sleep.  The film is subdued and often quietly alluring.  Ceylan’s central theme even transcends into the more technical building blocks of the film, giving audiences open cinematography that’s filled with details that always have our eyes grazing across its palette. But when you sign on for Winter’s Sleep, you’re in for the long haul.  While you may hear wonderful, deserving praise…

Reviews

Monk with a Camera

By: Addison Wylie It’s unlikely that a life story doesn’t strike a chord with anyone.  Nicholas “Nicky” Vreeland’s contributions to Buddhism have moved many, and it’s easy to see why.  His fascination and skill with photography (along with his overall pure intentions) made waves, and helped the Tibetan monk become more in touch with his new Buddist lifestyle. But, some life stories are lucky enough to sustain a feature length film and others are more…

Reviews

The Quiet Ones

By: Addison Wylie By this point, you pay to see The Quiet Ones and sort of know it’s going to be the fifty-seventh by-the-numbers possession film you’ve seen within the past decade.  You get a vibe that the film is riding off the success of other, more successful horror films and a lot of the scares will be abiding by the rules of “gotcha” spooks. The Quiet Ones reminded me of movies like The Conjuring…

Reviews

As Above, So Below

By: Addison Wylie I thought As Above, So Below was very, very dumb.  And, I’m someone who throughly enjoyed both National Treasure movies.  What does that say about me?  Not wise enough in general, or wise enough to draw a line?  My self-prognosis coming soon. But, yes, As Above, So Below is as dumb as movies get, and it wants its audience to take it so very seriously.  The aforementioned National Treasure movies fill similar…

Festival Coverage

Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival ’14: The Shorts

By: Addison Wylie Before another year of moviegoing goes into full swing, TIFF respectively collects a list of features and short films that astounded audiences and erupted conversation within the past year. TIFF’s annual Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival began on January 2 with Sturla Gunnarsson’s documentary Monsoon, and continues with other Canadian favourites such as Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Susan Avingaq’s doc Sol, as well as Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, which sparked buzz after the Québécois filmmaker won…

Reviews

Into the Woods

By: Addison Wylie Most of the complimentary things I can say about Rob Marshall’s Into the Woods stem from how inspired its original work is. The broadway musical of the same name (written by James Lapine with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim) interweaves your favourite fairy tales into a story that sprawls over three magical nights.  The story then continues with a pragmatic epilogue which results in a topsy-turvy conclusion.  Lapine’s musical has a…

Reviews

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

By: Addison Wylie The Hunger Games series has been particularly strong with its film adaptations.  However, something always appears to be slightly off key.  Not always a detail that greatly affects the film as a whole, but an attribute that hampers the film from being great. The Hunger Games was a powerful introduction to dystopian District 12 and all the have-nots that inhabited such a mucky home.  Audiences also received a brutal – yet PG-13…