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Trevor Chartrand

Reviews

Molly’s Game

By: Trevor Chartrand With Molly’s Game, screenwriting veteran Aaron Sorkin ups his career ante, taking a new seat at the table for his directorial debut.  Sorkin already has a massive advantage over most first-time directors, having worked closely with big players like David Fincher and Danny Boyle in the past.  And to top it all off, his ace-in-the-hole is the fact that the first script he brings to the screen is one of his own….

Reviews

The Shape of Water

By: Trevor Chartrand Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water is a masterfully crafted modern-day fairy tale.  An incredible, romanticized take on the creature feature, director/co-writer del Toro seamlessly combines genre and visual style to bring us this beautifully bizarre morality tale.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Art of Obsession’

By: Trevor Chartrand As a film that explores the creative process, Ryan M. Andrews’ Art of Obsession fails to bring much originality to the table.  This slow-paced, predictable little story takes itself too seriously, grasping aimlessly at faux-philosophical musings all along the way.  The film is an unfortunate mix of unconvincing plot, passionless performances, and a non-existent visual style.  It’s the kind of film I can still enjoy, however with a more ironic appreciation than…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Once Upon a Time at Christmas’

By: Trevor Chartrand While the concept of a homicidal Santa Claus has certainly been explored in slasher films like Santa’s Slay and Silent Night, Deadly Night, director Paul Tanter has found a surprisingly fresh approach to the ‘Killer Claus’ trope in Once Upon a Time at Christmas.  This fun and festive Canadian B-movie will give viewers a reason to keep the Christmas lights on overnight.

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow 2017: ‘Kill Order’

By: Trevor Chartrand Kill Order is essentially a Crank film without the charisma or charm.  It tries hard to be pulse-pounding and slick, but this punch-a-minute action flick is all fist and no fury.  Given the film’s structure, it’s not surprising to learn writer/director James Mark has a lot of stunt department work on his resume, including action-driven films like Jumper and Pacific Rim.  Kill Order favours style over substance, desperately stringing a series of…

Reviews

Mudbound

By: Trevor Chartrand Showcasing the contrast between two farming families in Mississippi, Mudbound examines the overbearing racist climate of the southern states in the 1940s.  Based on a novel of the same name and directed/co-written by Dee Rees, the film takes place both during and after the Second World War.  When a white family takes ownership of a Mississippi farm, they find themselves living in the fields among the black farmhands who will work for them….

Reviews

Lady Bird

By: Trevor Chartrand The meandering narrative of Lady Bird, though at times unfocused and opened-ended, is both heartwarming and humorous as it examines the life of a struggling teen overwhelmed by dysfunction and her perceived notion of persecution at every turn.  An offbeat coming-of-age comedy, Lady Bird wonderfully depicts the innocence of youth in search of love, purpose, and acceptance in a confusing and changing world.