Trevor Chartrand

Reviews

Puzzle

By: Trevor Chartrand By no means a masterpiece, Puzzle is a dramatic character study with some great performances – a quiet, nuanced beauty.  Moving at a slow yet even pace, this film assembles the puzzle of these characters’ lives, only to tear it apart – piece by piece.

Reviews

Euthanizer

By: Trevor Chartrand Helmed by Finnish filmmaker Teemu Nikki, Euthanizer is one moody, atmospheric and, frankly, zany thriller.  Between overlapping tones and strategic musical cues, this movie blends genres in a way that just shouldn’t work, but somehow does – it’s like combining the sweetest strawberries with jalapenos and raw sewage.  Euthanizer somehow creates a sweet, yet spicy, story that will leave a bad taste in your mouth (in a good way).

Reviews

Sorry to Bother You

By: Trevor Chartrand Boots Riley’s directorial debut is undoubtedly a memorable satiric comedy, despite being uneven in some places.  Sorry to Bother You is a tad ambitious – with plenty of high-concept ideas crammed into its runtime, the overall pacing and consistency of the film suffers a bit as a result.  But then again, it’s nice to see a film with too much to say, rather than something so vapid that it says nothing.

Reviews

Prodigals

By: Trevor Chartrand Michelle Ouellet’s Prodigals depicts a feeling as much as a narrative.  Based on a stage play of the same name, the film is about a group of 20-somethings reflecting on their lives, and coming to terms with the emptiness staring back at them.  While it may sound bleak and unsettling, the film isn’t without a few shimmering rays of hope.

Reviews

Hotel Artemis

By: Trevor Chartrand It’s refreshing to see original scripts can still make their way to the big screen!  Between the endless tirade of superhero movies, novel adaptations, sequels, remakes, and reboots, it’s rare to see something that’s actually fresh.  Films aren’t often greenlit without a built-in fanbase – and even when they are, they rarely rise above mediocrity.  Thankfully, this isn’t the case with Drew Pearce’s Hotel Artemis.  The film isn’t going to revolutionize cinema…

Reviews

The Child Remains

By: Trevor Chartrand Is it bad when the true-story version of a film sounds more entertaining than the fictionalized narrative we get instead?  That may be the case with The Child Remains, a film loosely inspired by the Butterbox Baby murders in WWII-Era Nova Scotia.

Reviews

Journey’s End

By: Trevor Chartrand Between the imminent threat of attack, the dank living conditions and the terrible rations, there’s no nightmare worse than enduring trench warfare.  Filmmaker Saul Dibb dares to depict these WWI conditions in Journey’s End, a gritty war drama with intense realism.  To be clear, this isn’t a film that celebrates war heroes or glorifies the battlefield.  Instead, the film follows a group of soldiers who are faced with the inevitable promise of death,…

Reviews

Isle of Dogs

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Wes Anderson is at it again with another quirky stop-motion animated feature, his second foray into the genre since 2009’s The Fantastic Mr. Fox.  In Isle of Dogs, Anderson’s gone above and beyond to create a clever, stylized, and memorable motion picture.