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Reviews

Mad Heidi

In the grindhouse tribute Mad Heidi, a maniacal dictator (Casper Van Dien) aspires to phase out the lactose intolerant with his firm laws for dairy consumption, which will then lead to world domination. This fascism leads our titular swiss miss (Alice Lucy) to be permanently distanced from her grandfather (David Schofield) and her hunky, underground cheese peddling lover Goat Peter (Kel Matsena).  Heidi is later thrown into an all-women’s prison where everyone exchanges intimidating looks and…

Reviews

Wylie Writes’ One-on-One with Jeremy Lalonde

When I reviewed a sci-fi flick named Ashgrove at this year’s Canadian Film Fest, I sensed that it was a different type of movie for its director Jeremy Lalonde.  It was significantly more dramatic than his previous work, which have either been ensemble comedies (Sex After Kids, How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town) or high-concept projects (The Go-Getters, James vs. His Future Self), and I felt like he was challenging himself as a storyteller to look…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Jonas Chernick

From his breakout with My Awkward Sexual Adventure to his recent collaborations with other actors and returning filmmakers, Jonas Chernick has been an actor/screenwriter to watch for.  The projects he creates or attaches himself to are filled with an unforgettable, compassionate energy.  His latest collaboration with director Jeremy LaLonde (How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town) and Becky’s Amanda Brugel is one of his strongest efforts to date, but it also might be the most he…

Reviews

The Vigil

Fans of last year’s spooky slow burn His House should be interested in Keith Thomas’ The Vigil as well, a bottled horror that has even more paranoid, claustrophobic dread also set against cultural values.

Reviews

Cinco de Mayo: The Battle

By: Addison Wylie Audiences were given Pompeii earlier this year, a sweeping epic that had Paul W.S. Anderson bumbling his way through a history lesson and throwing every type of  overused trope he could think of towards the paying public.  It was a boneheaded film that was calculated by people solely thinking of what mainstream audiences eat up, yet had no respected consideration towards those who endured Anderson’s mess. What Cinco de Mayo: The Battle…