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Creation Stories

Not very often do audiences receive a biopic as pointless and embarrassing as Creation Stories.  Then again, the filmmaker  could still benefit from a turkey like this.  If they believe their biopic holds valuable nostalgia or fan service, ham-fisted qualities can be forgiven by movie goers, allowing the movie to even win Oscars.  It worked for Bohemian Rhapsody.

Reviews

Senior Moment

Senior Moment is an unflattering example of what producers and filmmakers believe will connect with an older demographic.  It’s twee and fairly clean, stars familiar and likeable faces, and the plot uses a failsafe story of a has-been getting back on the saddle.  While this formula can hit its stride (Book Club, starring Diane Keaton, being a recent favourite), it can also shamelessly pander towards its audience (And So It Goes, another Keaton vehicle).  Perhaps if…

Reviews

Sugar Daddy

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Wendy Morgan has made an interesting and thought-provoking film with her drama Sugar Daddy.  The movie features the story of Darren, an aspiring musician who joins a paid dating service to make ends meet until her music career takes off.  While acting as arm candy for wealthy older guys at high society functions is by no means prostitution, Darren struggles with her own self-worth and the moral implications of selling herself…

Reviews

Jump, Darling

At a time when drag has made its way into mainstream media (thanks, in no small part, to the Emmy winning reality television show Ru Paul’s Drag Race), Jump, Darling stands as a much-needed antidote to the commodification of an art form that was created by and for queer and trans people.  It isn’t a bad thing that straight folks these days know what a death drop is, but at times it does feel as…

Reviews

The World to Come

The World to Come, the second feature from Norwegian filmmaker Mona Fastvold (The Sleepwalker), is a plodding meditation on love and grief that is salvaged from mediocrity by the palpable chemistry between its lead actors.  Still, the film doesn’t offer much that is fresh of exciting and rehashes some tired lesbian period piece tropes.

Reviews

Make Up

Claire Oakley’s Make Up tells the story of a young woman named Ruth (Molly Windsor) who goes to a trailer park in Cornwall to be with her boyfriend, where she learns that he may be cheating on her.  As she attempts to come to terms with this realization, she begins to come to terms with the fact that she may be gay, as she finds herself obsessed with another woman.  This is a story that…

Reviews

The Dissident

By: Trevor Chartrand Informative and eye-opening, The Dissident is a haunting documentary that’s shockingly timely and relevant, especially considering last week’s siege in Washington.  Among other things, this film demonstrates the dangerous potential of social media when used in the wrong way.

Reviews

Survival Skills

The police have always been fertile territory for mockery;  from the bumbling cop who always misses the crime to the surly “good cop” who gets shot two days before retirement.  In the last decade, however, that mockery has become problematized in and of itself, whether by people who think that the police should be above reproach or people who think that making light of the police normalizes their brutality.  As such, police satire needs to walk a…

Reviews

Rocks

Sarah Gavron’s Rocks is a realist coming-of-age drama that follows a young girl of colour, “Rocks” (Bukky Bakray), as she struggles caring for her younger brother after their mother leaves without warning.  Aggressively directed and acted, Rocks offers a poignant intersectional look at race, poverty, and gender in the context of the United Kingdom, where the racial tensions–let alone economic tensions–triggered by Brexit are flourishing.