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Reviews

Hell’s Kitty

Hell’s Kitty, a film that has been assembled from a web series of the same name conceived by writer/director Nicholas Tana, makes for an amusing in-joke for horror hounds.  The cameos alone from iconic character actors are enough to make those fans beam.  For instance, The Hills Have Eyes’ Michael Berryman appears as a testy detective, while Heir’s Bill Oberst Jr. and The Shape of Water’s Doug Jones star as a devout duo who attempt to exorcize…

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Joyce Wong

By: Jessica Goddard Wexford Plaza was one of the best films of 2017, and it was also a finalist for the Toronto Film Critic Association’s award for Best Canadian Film.  As the film celebrates its home release on digital platforms, I reached out to writer/director Joyce Wong to ask about her feature debut, its universal story, and her personal connection to the film.

Reviews

Birdland

By: Nick van Dinther Some films can be accused of lazy storytelling and a lack of risk.  Well, neither apply to Peter Lynch’s Birdland.  Unfortunately, Lynch’s convoluted ambition makes Birdland a very difficult film to follow.

Reviews

Strawberry Flavored Plastic

Strawberry Flavored Plastic combines elements of found-footage horror and mockumentary to create a story about two documentarians (Nicholas Urda, Andreas Montejo) making a movie about a serial killer, Noel Rose (Aidan Bristow).  With testimonials, first-person video, and video conferencing, the audience learns how this “film” slips out from underneath its makers and how it goes awry.

Reviews

Considering Love & Other Magic

I didn’t believe anything in Considering Love & Other Magic.  These characters are so disengaged, you could set them on fire and all they would do is shrug.  They’re all too busy pondering about death;  mostly the long-term existentialism that lingers when a loved one passes away.  The press release describes Dave Schultz’s film as a “family movie”.  Try explaining that pitch to your kids.  You’ll owe them ice cream after the show.

Reviews

Lady Bird

By: Trevor Chartrand The meandering narrative of Lady Bird, though at times unfocused and opened-ended, is both heartwarming and humorous as it examines the life of a struggling teen overwhelmed by dysfunction and her perceived notion of persecution at every turn.  An offbeat coming-of-age comedy, Lady Bird wonderfully depicts the innocence of youth in search of love, purpose, and acceptance in a confusing and changing world.

Reviews

White Night

There’s an art project titled White Night.  It’s a collaborative between five filmmakers (Sonny Atkins, P.H. Bergeron, Brian Hamilton, Matt Purdy, Dan Slater) and it chronicles six fictitious stories during Toronto’s Nuit Blanche – an all-nighter dedicated to art.  One of the characters, a struggling artist named Emily, contributes a cumbersome piece made entirely out of stacked cardboard boxes.  People pass by and heckle at it, while Emily fumes and eventually releases the tension through a…